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How do I recognize gluten-free products?

  1. Grains containing gluten are used in many products and ingredients. For example in: bread, crackers, rusks, muesli, biscuits, pastries, pizza, pasta, couscous, bulgur and seitan. Flour, flour, binding agents and breadcrumbs are usually made from gluten-containing grains. That is why many soups, sauces, meat products, custard, licorice and other products in which you may not expect it contain gluten. Gluten can also occur in: some vitamin supplements and medications. It is therefore advisable to check the packaging if you are taking vitamins. smoker's toothpaste and adhesive paste for dental prostheses. Toothpaste is always gluten-free. some craft materials and wallpaper glue. This can be a point of attention, especially with small children, because they easily put anything in their mouth. See www.glutenvrij.nl/nonfood for gluten in non food and a list of gluten-free craft materials. animal feed. Therefore, always wash your hands after feeding a pet or animal. disposable tableware and cutlery made from wheat bran. This contains gluten. Gluten can get into your food or drink via these plates or cutlery, which can cause complaints. Read more.

  2. Grains containing gluten are used in many products and ingredients. For example in: bread, crackers, rusks, muesli, biscuits, pastries, pizza, pasta, couscous, bulgur and seitan. Flour, flour, binding agents and breadcrumbs are usually made from gluten-containing grains. That is why many soups, sauces, meat products, custard, licorice and other products in which you may not expect it contain gluten. Gluten can also occur in: some vitamin supplements and medications. It is therefore advisable to check the packaging if you are taking vitamins. smoker's toothpaste and adhesive paste for dental prostheses. Toothpaste is always gluten-free. some craft materials and wallpaper glue. This can be a point of attention especially with small children, because they easily put anything in their mouth. See www.glutenvrij.nl/nonfood for gluten in non food and a list of gluten-free craft materials. animal feed. Always wash your hands after feeding a pet or animal. disposable tableware and cutlery made from wheat bran. This contains gluten. Gluten can enter your food or drink through these plates or cutlery, and that can cause complaints. Read more.

How do you read labels?

  1. Always read the label. That's the most important rule of thumb when buying gluten-free products. On the label you will find all the information you need to find gluten-free products. Please note the following: 1. The term 'gluten free' on the packaging or the official 'Crossed Grain' label Products that bear the official 'Crossed Grain' quality mark - with a unique number underneath - have been checked according to the strictest standards. The Dutch Celiac Society assesses these products as "safe gluten-free" (less than 20 milligrams of gluten per kilo). Gluten-free is a legally protected term. According to the Commodities Act, a product may bear the term "gluten-free" if the product contains less than 20 milligrams of gluten per kilo. The amount of gluten in these products is so low that in most people the small intestinal mucosa recovers. 2. Look for gluten-containing grains on the ingredients list Is the term "gluten-free" not on the packaging and is there no 'Crossed Grain' quality mark on it? Then there may be gluten in the product. The ingredients list states if there are gluten-containing grains in a product. This is a legal requirement for all foods. The following gluten-containing grains must be clearly visible on the label, for example, in bold or capital letters: Wheat Spelled Khorasan wheat (brand name kamut) Rye Barley Oats. Oats are naturally gluten-free, but are regularly 'contaminated' with gluten. The group name "gluten" is not mandatory. For example, the translation wheat = gluten has to be made yourself. 3. Look for warnings on the label Sometimes products that contain basically only gluten-free ingredients have a gluten warning. Sometimes it's very small on the label, so it's good to read the fine print as well. A common warning is: "May contain traces of gluten" or "Has been processed in an environment where gluten is present" We call this a cross-contamination warning. Manufacturers sometimes indicate this when they cannot guarantee that the product is free from gluten. Small amounts of (trace) gluten may have accidentally entered the product (cross-contamination). For example, because different products are made or packaged one after the other in the same machine or simultaneously in the same space. This statement is not mandatory. This means that products without this statement can also be contaminated with gluten. And the other way around also applies: products with the cross-contamination warning are not per se contaminated with gluten. Therefore, preferably use products with the claim 'gluten-free' or the 'Crossed Grain' quality mark. "Low gluten content" The term "very low gluten content" may be used by law if the product contains 20 to 100 milligrams of gluten per kilo. These products are therefore not gluten-free and not suitable for people with celiac disease. These products are not or hardly ever found in stores.

  2. Always read the label. That's the most important rule of thumb when buying gluten-free products. On the label you will find all the information you need to find gluten-free products. Please note the following: 1. The term 'gluten free' on the packaging or the official 'Crossed Grain' label Products that bear the official 'Crossed Grain' quality mark - with a unique number underneath - have been checked according to the strictest standards. The Dutch Celiac Society assesses these products as "safe gluten-free" (less than 20 milligrams of gluten per kilo). Gluten-free is a legally protected term. According to the Commodities Act, a product may bear the term "gluten-free" if the product contains less than 20 milligrams of gluten per kilo. The amount of gluten in these products is so low that in most people the small intestinal mucosa recovers. 2. Look for gluten-containing grains on the ingredient list Is the term "gluten-free" not on the packaging and is there no 'Crossed Grain' quality mark on it? Then there may be gluten in the product. It is stated in the ingredients list if there are gluten-containing grains in a product. This is a legal requirement for all foods. The following gluten-containing grains must be clearly visible on the label, for example, in bold or capital letters: Wheat Spelled Khorasan wheat (brand name kamut) Rye Barley Oats. Oats are naturally gluten-free, but are regularly 'contaminated' with gluten. The group name "gluten" is not mandatory. For example, the translation wheat = gluten has to be made yourself. 3. Look for warnings on the label Sometimes products that contain basically only gluten-free ingredients will have a gluten warning. Sometimes it's very small on the label, so it's good to read the fine print as well. A common warning is: "May contain traces of gluten" or "Has been processed in an environment where gluten is present" We call this a cross-contamination warning. Manufacturers sometimes indicate this when they cannot guarantee that the product is free from gluten. Small amounts of (trace) gluten may have accidentally entered the product (cross-contamination). For example, because different products are made or packaged one after the other in the same machine or simultaneously in the same space. This statement is not mandatory. This means that products without this statement can also be contaminated with gluten. And the other way around also applies: products with the cross-contamination warning are not per se contaminated with gluten. Therefore, preferably use products with the claim 'gluten-free' or the 'Crossed Grain' quality mark. "Low gluten content" The term "with very low gluten content" may be used by law if the product contains 20 to 100 milligrams of gluten per kilo. These products are therefore not gluten-free and not suitable for people with celiac disease. These products are hardly or not at all available in stores.

What if there is no label on a product?

  1. According to the Food Information Act, information about gluten must always be available. So also in restaurants, bakers, butchers, on the market or in web shops they are obliged to provide information about gluten when someone asks about it.

  2. Information about gluten must be available at all times according to the Food Information Act. So also in restaurants, bakers, butchers, on the market or in web shops they are obliged to provide information about gluten when someone asks about it.

Which foods are naturally gluten-free?

  1. You can read how gluten-free products can be recognized under the heading 'Label' above. Naturally gluten-free are in any case: Rice (pericarp) (Sweet potatoes Legumes (dried or fresh), such as kidney and white beans, capuchins, lentils, chickpeas and soybeans The following unprocessed grains: sorghum, amaranth, teff, millet, quinoa, buckwheat and corn (Fresh and dried) vegetables and fruit Nuts, seeds, kernels and peanuts Fresh or dried (simple) herbs Dutch cheese made from cow, goat and sheep Unprocessed fish and crustaceans and shellfish Unprocessed meat, poultry (such as chicken) and game Raw tofu, tempeh and soy chunks Eggs Natural milk, yogurt and cottage cheese Butter and oil Tea and coffee Gluten Free Diet Products Examples of gluten-free diet products are gluten-free bread, gluten-free flour for baking bread, pastries or cookies, gluten-free crackers and cookies, gluten-free bake-off breads, gluten-free puff pastry and gluten-free pasta such as spaghetti. You can buy these products in health food stores, health food stores, supermarkets and via the internet. Gluten Free Recipes The recipe finder contains almost 1,000 gluten-free recipes. To do this, turn on the filter "free from gluten" under "fits in diet".

Are there any apps that help you follow a gluten-free diet?

  1. With the 'Kies I Healthy?' App you can easily find out whether a product is gluten-free. You can easily select the option "gluten" or the "Crossed Grain" quality mark. If you scan the barcode of a product in the store, you can immediately see whether it contains gluten. You can download the app for free from the Google and Apple stores.



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