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Coffee supports your digestion

  1. With three to four cups per day, we in the Netherlands are among the top coffee drinkers in the world. Only in the Scandinavian countries do people drink more coffee. All that coffee isn't as bad for you as you might think. Coffee, for example, has surprisingly positive effects on your digestion.

  2. With three to four cups a day, we in the Netherlands are among the top coffee drinkers in the world. Only in the Scandinavian countries do people drink more coffee. All that coffee isn't as bad for you as you might think. Coffee, for example, has surprisingly positive effects on your digestion.

Coffee and your stomach

  1. As soon as moisture or food enters your stomach, digestive juices are produced. Even if this is coffee. Research shows that coffee stimulates gastrin production. This is a hormone that increases stomach acid production. That stomach acid is needed to better digest the food in your stomach. In that sense, coffee helps to start digestion in your stomach. But what about complaints such as heartburn? That is not the direct result of coffee. Heartburn occurs when the acidic stomach contents flow back to the esophagus because the seal between the stomach and esophagus is not (anymore) completely optimal. The lack of proper closure is the cause. If you suffer from this, coffee can cause complaints. Just like spicy spicy food, beer, wine and carbonated drinks. Being overweight can also lead to heartburn. It used to be thought that you can get a stomach ulcer from coffee. Also not true, because stomach ulcers are caused by bacterial infections and not by drinking coffee. It may be the case that coffee does not work well if you have a stomach ulcer. What is striking is a result of international research that gastric acid production is less after drinking coffee from dark roasted beans; the so-called dark roasts (spicy coffee). Gastrin production appears to be lower and therefore less induced stomach acid is produced than with the less roasted coffees.

  2. As soon as moisture or food enters your stomach, digestive juices are produced. Even if this is coffee. Research shows that coffee stimulates gastrin production. This is a hormone that increases stomach acid production. That stomach acid is needed to better digest the food in your stomach. In that sense, coffee helps to start digestion in your stomach. But what about complaints such as heartburn? That is not the direct result of coffee. Heartburn occurs when the acidic stomach contents flow back to the esophagus because the seal between the stomach and esophagus is not (anymore) completely optimal. The lack of proper closure is the cause. If you suffer from this, coffee can cause complaints. Just like spicy food, beer, wine and carbonated drinks. Being overweight can also lead to heartburn. It used to be thought that coffee can give you a stomach ulcer. Also not true, because stomach ulcers are caused by bacterial infections and not by drinking coffee. It may be the case that coffee does not work well if you have a stomach ulcer. What is striking is a result of international research that gastric acid production is less after drinking coffee from dark roasted beans; the so-called dark roasts (spicy coffee). The gastrin production appears to be lower in this case and therefore less is stimulated to produce gastric acid than with the less roasted coffees.

Coffee and your gallbladder and pancreas

  1. Your gallbladder and pancreas play an important role in digestion. These organs make substances, including hormones and enzymes, that are needed to break down food so that it can be absorbed into your blood. Research shows that drinking coffee is associated with a lower risk of gallbladder problems and a lower risk of inflammation of the pancreas. Exactly how that works is not yet clear. It appears to run through the hormone cholecystokinin (CCK). Its production increases by drinking coffee. CCK is made in the duodenum and small intestine. CCK stimulates the pancreas to secrete enzymes that ensure the digestion of proteins, fats and carbohydrates. It also acts on the gallbladder, causing it to produce bile. Bile emulsifies fats so that they are more easily absorbed by the body. So coffee seems to aid digestion in such a way.

  2. Your gallbladder and pancreas play an important role in digestion. These organs make substances, including hormones and enzymes, that are needed to break down food so that it can be absorbed into your blood. Research shows that drinking coffee is associated with a lower risk of gallbladder problems and a lower risk of inflammation of the pancreas. Exactly how that works is not yet clear. It appears to be via the hormone cholecystokinin (CCK). Its production increases by drinking coffee. CCK is made in the duodenum and small intestine. CCK stimulates the pancreas to secrete enzymes that ensure the digestion of proteins, fats and carbohydrates. It also acts on the gallbladder, causing it to produce bile. Bile emulsifies fats so that they are more easily absorbed by the body. So coffee seems to aid digestion in such a way.

Coffee and the large intestine

  1. The last part of the digestive tract in your body is the colon. Mainly water is absorbed here. As a result, the indigestible residues thicken, the longer it remains in the intestine. This is how your stool is created. In general, the colon responds with contractions as soon as food enters the stomach. Because of these contractions, the entire mass in the intestine shifts a little further towards the exit. This is called the gastrocolic reflex. It usually occurs quite quickly after a meal and is a logical reaction of the body: space has to be made. This is also the reason that many people have to go to the toilet after breakfast. Many people find that they can also quickly go to the toilet after drinking coffee. Indeed, coffee can also trigger that gastrocolic reflex, but no more or less than other foods. The degree of responses does differ from person to person. One reacts more strongly to coffee the other to food.

  2. The last part of the digestive tract in your body is the colon. Mainly water is absorbed here. As a result, the indigestible residues thicken the longer it remains in the intestine. This is how your stool is created. In general, the colon responds with contractions as soon as food enters the stomach. Due to these contractions, the entire mass in the intestine shifts a little further towards the exit. This is called the gastrocolic reflex. It usually occurs quite quickly after a meal and is a logical reaction of the body: space has to be made. This is also the reason that many people have to go to the toilet after breakfast. Many people find that they can also quickly go to the toilet after drinking coffee. Indeed, coffee can also trigger that gastrocolic reflex, but no more or less than other foods. The degree of responses differs from person to person. One reacts more strongly to coffee the other to food.

Coffee and the gut microbiome The last part of your digestive tract - your colon - contains a lot of bacteria. They play an important role for your health. The so-called gut microbiome - all bacteria together in your gut - helps with the digestion of the last scraps and ensures the building and maintenance of a good resistance. It is therefore important that there are mainly beneficial bacteria present in your gut microbiome. Recently, more and more has become known about what can support the growth of those beneficial bacteria. Coffee also seems to play a role. Substances in coffee such as phenols, acids and fibers appear to support the growth of the beneficial bifidobacteria. There is bound to be more research on these interesting aspects of coffee. How Much Coffee Is Healthy? So coffee can support your digestion, but how much coffee is healthy now? According to the Nutrition Center, coffee is part of a healthy diet, but they recommend that adults do not consume more than four cups of filter coffee per day. They adhere to this maximum amount because coffee contains a certain amount of cafestol and kahweol. These substances from the coffee (which, by the way, partly remain in the filter) can increase the LDL cholesterol in the blood. A higher consumption of coffee with cafestol and kahweol therefore increases the risk of increased LDL cholesterol. And that is detrimental to the health of the blood vessels. Filter coffee contains the least cafestol and kahweol. Boiled coffee or coffee from a cafeteria is most suitable. Drink a maximum of 1 cup of this per day. Espresso or coffee from cups is a bit in between. The advice is to drink a maximum of two to three per day. Due to the content of the stimulant caffeine, the Nutrition Center recommends that children under the age of 13 do not give coffee and pregnant women are therefore advised to take a maximum of 1 cup per day. Also read Is tea really that healthy? Don't miss anything anymore?

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