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The healing power of tamarind

  1. Tamarind is an Indian tree fruit that is often used in dishes. The tree is originally from India, but nowadays it is grown in all tropical areas. Tamarind is a delicious addition to the food and delicious syrup drinks are made from it. In addition, it has various medicinal properties. Tamarind is for sale in the Netherlands at Asian shops in the form of pressed tamarind pulp. In some shops, dried, sugared tamarind is sold as candy.

Origin name

  1. In Latin, the plant is called tamarindus indica. The name tamarindus comes from the Arabic Tamar-Hindi which means 'Date of India'. Tamarind pulp is somewhat reminiscent of date pulp

Tamarind culinary

  1. Tamarind is used in various ways in the kitchen. It is made into a drink. Jam is made from the pulp. It is used in sauces such as chutneys, and some cooks in Indonesia use tamarind to make a fresh peanut sauce with gado-gado, an Indonesian vegetable dish with peanut sauce. Tamarind is tart and is used in place of vinegar or lemon juice. Tamarind is used in Indian Bloeisel tamarind tree / Source: TauÊ olunga, Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA-3.0)

Nutrients tamarind

  1. There are many phytonutrients in the tamarind fruit. The Indian date mainly contains organic fruit acids which have a medicinal effect. It contains tartaric acid, malic acid, citric acid, succinic acid, oxalic acid and some ascorbic acid, better known as vitamin C. In addition, it contains pectin, gums, lactic acid, nicotinic acid and various essential oils such as: the monoterpenes, geraniol, limonene and geranial. Other Tamarind / Source: Kastn DiskCat, Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA-3.0)

Vitamins and minerals tamarind

  1. Tamarind contains many vitamins and minerals. Thiamine or B1 is the vitamin that contains the most. 100 grams of tamarind contains 26% of the Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA) of B1. Vitamin B3 or niacin contains 12% of the RDA in the fruit that Indonesians call asam. Vitamin C is in it with 6% of the RDI and pyridoxine or B6 with 5%. The other vitamins have percentages lower than 5%. In terms of minerals, tamarine mainly contains iron. 100 grams of tamarin accounts for 35% of the RDI. Other minerals in this tropical fruit are: magnesium (23%), phosphorus (16% RDA), potassium (13% RDA), copper (10% RDA) and calcium (7% RDA). The other minerals have very low percentages. In addition, one ounce of tamarind contains 5% of the RDI of protein and 13% of the RDA of fiber

Other medicinal effects

  1. Because it is antipyretic, cooling and thirst-quenching, tamarind is given to people with a fever. As it is digestive and bile-repellent, Indian date is used for nausea in pregnant Tamarind tree / Source: B. Navez, Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-2.5) women, and as an adjuvant for bile duct disorders and jaundice. Tamarind is disinfectant; it counteracts the bacteria bactillus subtillus and E. coli and is therefore used against diarrhea and dysentery. Because tamarind lowers blood sugar, it is given to people with hyperglycaemia and adult-onset diabetes.

Consult the herbalist

  1. If you want to use tamarind as a medicine, it is best to take a consultation with a herbalist. Tamarind extracts and medicines in the form of mother tinctures, powders and capsules should only be taken on prescription by authorized persons. A doctor or herbalist can advise you on this. All medicinal effects of tamarind mentioned in this article are based on scientific research and come from Geert Verhelst's Great Handbook of Medicinal Plants, a standard work in the field of healing plants. The book is widely used in phytotherapy.

  2. If you want to use tamarind as a medicine, it is best to consult a herbalist. Tamarind extracts and medicines in the form of mother tinctures, powders and capsules should only be taken on prescription by authorized persons. A doctor or herbalist can advise you on this. All medicinal effects of tamarind mentioned in this article are based on scientific research and come from Geert Verhelst's Great Handbook of Medicinal Plants, a standard work in the field of healing plants. The book is widely used in phytotherapy.



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