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This is what your menstrual blood says about your health

  1. Is your period jam-colored with large lumps or watery and pink? The color and texture of your menstrual blood says more about your health than you think.

  1. Of course, if you don't have a period, you often know how the flag hangs. But your period tells more about your health than whether or not you are pregnant. The color of your menstrual blood, for example, is a good indication of your hormone balance, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists discovered. This does not mean that you have to see a doctor for every color difference: it is normal for your menstrual blood to change color and quantity during the approximately five days of bleeding. The more blood, the darker it looks.

  2. Of course, if you don't have a period, you often know how the flag hangs. But your period tells more about your health than whether or not you are pregnant. The color of your menstrual blood, for example, is a good indication of your hormone balance, as the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists discovered. This does not mean that you have to see a doctor for every color difference: it is normal for your menstrual blood to change color and quantity during the approximately five days of bleeding. The more blood, the darker it looks.

Pinkish

  1. If your menstrual blood is pinkish in color, your estrogen levels may be on the low side. This is certainly the case if you have already been bleeding less than normal for several cycles or if you are too fanatic an athlete. Research shows that excessive exercise can lead to lower estrogen levels, causing your period to become unbalanced or even disappear completely. Low estrogen levels can cause osteoporosis, among other things, but can also be a symptom of PCOS or menopause. Women with a low body weight are more likely to suffer from estrogen deficiency. In addition, stress and taking the contraceptive pill can affect your estrogen level. Sometimes low estrogen levels are accompanied by complaints such as vaginal dryness, less sex drive, dry skin and joint pain. If you suspect a low estrogen level, it is wise to see a doctor.

  2. If your menstrual blood is pinkish in color, your estrogen levels may be on the low side. This is certainly the case if you have already been bleeding less than normal for several cycles or if you are too fanatic an athlete. Research shows that excessive exercise can lead to lower estrogen levels, causing your period to become unbalanced or even disappear completely. Low estrogen levels can cause osteoporosis, among other things, but can also be a symptom of PCOS or the menopause. Women with a low body weight are more likely to suffer from estrogen deficiency. In addition, stress and taking the contraceptive pill can affect your estrogen level. Sometimes low estrogen levels are accompanied by complaints such as vaginal dryness, less sex drive, dry skin and joint pain. If you suspect a low estrogen level, it is wise to see a doctor.

Watery periods

  1. If your menstrual blood looks whitish and watery, it can be a symptom of anemia, especially if there is less and less blood flow around the second and third day in recent months (when your period normally just slightly heavier). Are you not bothered by anything? Then look at it for a month or two to three and then have your blood taken by the doctor if it does not improve. Do you often feel dizzy, tired and faint? Then go straight to the doctor. Ironically, iron deficiency can also be caused by a period that is much heavier. For example, if you have to change tampons or sanitary pads every hour due to leakage and you need a new one several times during the night. If you're almost always tired and a little absent, see a doctor to have your iron level checked.

  2. If your menstrual blood looks whitish and watery, it can be a symptom of anemia, especially if the blood flow in recent months is decreasing around the second and third day (when your period normally heavier). Are you not bothered by anything? Then look at it for a month or two to three and then have your blood taken by the doctor if it does not improve. Do you often feel dizzy, tired and faint? Then go straight to the doctor. Ironically, iron deficiency can also be caused by a period that is much heavier. For example, if you have to change tampons or sanitary pads every hour because of leakage and you need a new dressing several times during the night. If you're almost always tired and a little absent, see a doctor to have your iron level checked.

Jam colored and lumpy

  1. Do you see large clumps in your menstrual blood and is it jam-colored? Then you can have a high estrogen level combined with a low progesterone level. Incidentally, a few lumps in your blood are fairly normal; it is only suspected when they are larger than a fifty cent coin. This may indicate a hormone imbalance. Some specialists believe it helps to cut down on dairy, sugar and soy. You can try if this makes a difference. Incidentally, a disturbed hormone balance sometimes indicates a fibroid; you often have pain complaints. In that case, report to your doctor or gynecologist for a vaginal ultrasound. Women with elevated estrogen levels also often report breast tenderness and PMS.

  2. Do you see large clumps in your menstrual blood and is it jam-colored? Then you can have a high estrogen level, combined with a low progesterone level. Incidentally, a few lumps in your blood are fairly normal; it is only suspected when they are larger than a fifty cent coin. This may indicate a hormone imbalance. Some specialists believe it helps to cut down on dairy, sugar and soy. You can try if this makes a difference. Incidentally, a disturbed hormone balance sometimes indicates a fibroid; you often have pain complaints. In that case, report to your doctor or gynecologist for a vaginal ultrasound. Women with elevated estrogen levels also often report breast tenderness and PMS.

Brown to black

  1. If your menstrual blood is dark brown to black, then leftover uterine mucus and blood will come out with it. This is common, usually at the beginning and end of your period, and is not a cause for alarm. The blood has simply had a little more time to oxidize ('rust'), turning it brown to black. If you suffer from intermediate spotting, or brownish blood stains in your panties between periods, visit the doctor.

  2. If your menstrual blood is dark brown to black, then leftover uterine mucus and blood will come out with it. This is common, usually at the beginning and end of your period, and is not a cause for alarm. The blood has simply had a little more time to oxidize ('rust'), causing it to turn brown to black. If you suffer from intermediate spotting, or brownish blood stains in your panties between periods, visit the doctor.

Gray red or orange

  1. Is the color of your period gray-red? That could mean you have a sexually transmitted infection (STD) or infection. In general, your menstrual blood smells bad in that case. Then go to the doctor to have you tested. Women who have miscarried sometimes find some greyish remnants of tissue in their periods. Do you think that's the case with you? Then go to the doctor. Orange-colored blood is also a reason to go to the doctor. Usually it's nothing, just a little bit of uterine lining that mixes with your menstrual blood. However, it could indicate an infection.

Bright red

  1. A bright red color is the 'normal' color for menstrual blood. The color may vary slightly from woman to woman, but fire-brigade red blood means that everything works basically as it should. Some women describe the color as 'purplish' when the bleeding is heavy. In the morning, the color may be slightly darker. A A



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