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12 facts and fables about water

  1. Your body needs enough fluid to function properly. Water is preferable to soft drinks and fruit juices. But does it still matter what kind of water you drink? For example, is coconut water healthier than tap water? And does water with bubbles make you fat? Twelve facts and myths about water.

1. It doesn't matter what you drink, it's the total daily fluid intake

  1. Myth. When looking at your fluid intake, all non-alcoholic drinks, coffee, tea, water, vegetables and fruit count. That does not alter the fact that water has advantages over other drinks. Water is caffeine and sugar free, contains no calories and no dyes or other additives. Provided you are wary of water poisoning, you can drink a lot of it.

  2. Myth. When looking at your fluid intake, all non-alcoholic drinks, coffee, tea, water, vegetables and fruit count. This does not alter the fact that water has advantages over other drinks. Water is caffeine and sugar free, contains no calories and no dyes or other additives. Provided you are wary of water poisoning you can drink a lot of it.

2. Drinking water is best spread over the day

  1. Fact. It is better to drink small amounts during the day than a large amount at one time. Don't wait until you get thirsty. Thirst is the first sign that your body is not getting enough water.

  2. Fact. It is better to drink small amounts during the day than a large amount at once. Don't wait until you get thirsty. Thirst is the first sign that your body is not getting enough water.

3. Sparkling water makes you fat

  1. Myth. Sparkling mineral water - just like other waters - does not contain any kilocalories. So it will not make you fat. The carbon dioxide can make you feel bloated.

4. Water with bubbles contains too much salt

  1. Partly true. Only very highly mineralized mineral waters can contain a lot of salt, which can lead to moisture retention. Of course it also counts for your daily salt intake. Most mineral waters on the Dutch market, however, contain virtually no salts. Do you want to make sure that your mineral water is not too salty? Then check the label: if it contains more than 0.015 grams (or 15 mg) of sodium per 100 milliliters, you better choose a different brand.

5. Coconut water is better than tap water

  1. Myth. Coconut water and tap or mineral water are equally moisturizing. There are certainly many good ingredients in real coconut water, but many manufacturers only add coconut flavor to their water. The healthiest is the most natural variety. Some brands of coconut water are very high in sugars or other added ingredients. So always study the label carefully and drink it in moderation.

  2. Myth. Coconut water and tap or mineral water are equally moisturizing. There are certainly many good ingredients in real coconut water, but many manufacturers only add the coconut flavor to their water. The healthiest is the most natural variety. Some brands of coconut water are very high in sugars or other added ingredients. So always study the label carefully and drink it in moderation.

6. Sparkling water is bad for your teeth

  1. Myth. When carbon dioxide is dissolved in water, it forms small amounts of carbonic acid. This increases the acidity of the water slightly. However, research into the effects of various mineral and carbonated waters has shown that none of the waters were harmful to teeth. Most water contains small amounts of calcium and other minerals. These minerals buffer the effect of the carbon dioxide and protect the tooth enamel.

7. How much water you should drink differs per person

  1. Fact. As an adult you lose about 2.5 to 3 liters of fluid per day. Most of the fluid leaves your body through the urine, some is absorbed by your body cells and organs and the rest is lost through perspiration, breathing and bowel movements. Of course you have to replenish what you lose. The exact moisture requirement differs from person to person. Your age, body weight and the degree to which you move determine your ultimate need for moisture. The ambient temperature also plays a role. On average, our food provides 1 liter of water. The digestion and other body processes also give another 0.3 to 0.5 liters. The remaining 1.5 liters must therefore be drunk. If you drink too little, this will affect your mood and concentration, but your physical capacities will also drop considerably.

  2. Fact. As an adult you lose about 2.5 to 3 liters of fluid per day. Most of the fluid leaves your body through the urine, some is absorbed by your body cells and organs and the rest is lost through perspiration, breathing and bowel movements. Of course you have to replenish what you lose. The exact moisture requirement differs from person to person. Your age, body weight and the degree to which you move determine your ultimate need for fluids. The ambient temperature also plays a role. On average, our food provides 1 liter of water. Digestion and other body processes also give another 0.3 to 0.5 liters. The remaining 1.5 liters must therefore be drunk. If you drink too little, this will affect your mood and concentration, but your physical capacities will also drop considerably.

8. The plastic in water bottles is pathogenic

  1. Myth. The rumors are mainly about bisphenol A (Bpa). This is used in combination with other chemicals to make plastic. It is used, among other things, for the production of the hard, transparent plastic polycarbonate, which in turn is used to make bottles for, for example, baby food and dairy. Spring or mineral water is usually in recyclable or disposable bottles. Both types are the same in terms of material composition, the difference is that the disposable bottles are thinner. These bottles are made of so-called stable plastic, without softening agents. So the plastic that bottles are made of does not contain harmful chemicals.

9. Refilling water bottles is bad for you

  1. Partly true. Refilling a water bottle is fine. However, do not spend too long with one bottle. Wageningen University conducted research into refilling water bottles. They looked at enterobacteria, also called faecal bacteria, and the numbers of germ counts. These numbers indicate the quality of the water in the bottles. In 53 percent of the bottles, the bacterial count was higher than 100,000 per milliliter, which is comparable to ditch water. The filth is easy to explain: the food that remains in your mouth ends up in the water of the bottle while you are drinking. If the bottle is never rinsed properly or is not replaced, the residues will remain alive in the water and will have the opportunity to grow further and further. So replace your water bottle regularly with a new one and wash bottles in the meantime with hot water and washing-up liquid.

10. All water is the same

  1. Myth. The difference between tap water, spring water and mineral water is laid down by law. Natural mineral and spring water must come from a recognized source, be safe to drink at the source, and bottled at the source. Natural mineral water must also have a stable mineral composition. This is not mandatory for spring water. Tap water can come from various sources and is purified before it enters our pipes.

11. Older people should drink more

  1. Myth. Older people - just like other people - need to take in enough fluids. However, the elderly do have a less developed thirst feeling. Drinking too little is one of the factors that can lead to a decrease in cognitive skills and forgetfulness. It is therefore important to keep an eye on whether there is enough to drink, about 1.5 liters per day.

12. Water helps with weight loss

  1. Fact. Water can replace all your other drinks and it makes you feel full. This in turn has the effect that you eat less and thus consume fewer calories.



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