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Burns: 1st to 3rd degree

  1. Sitting just a little too long in the sun, grabbing a (too) hot pan or messing with a chemical substance: burns come in all shapes and sizes. Minor burns that are over in a day or life-threateningly large.

  1. When the skin is damaged by the action of heat, a chemical or electricity, we speak of a burn. Every year, some 10,000 people report to the emergency room with a burn. In addition, around 870 people are admitted to a burns center each year with serious to very serious injuries. More than 10 percent of the victims were injured by flammable substances such as bioethanol and methylated spirits; substances commonly used to light the barbecue. But accidents with hot steam, frying oil and fire are also common. Fireworks - along with explosions - account for 5 percent of burn injuries. 26 percent of all burns involve children under the age of 4.

There are three types of burns:

  1. 1st degree second degree third degree

First degree combustion

  1. In a first degree injury, the skin is not broken. That is why it is referred to as a first degree burn and not a first degree burn. Such a burn occurs when, for example, you sit unprotected in the sun for too long and can cause a lot of pain. You can compare it with an inflammatory reaction. A first-degree burn is not dangerous and usually disappears within 24 hours. It is advisable to cool the skin and apply an unscented body lotion or aftersun. If necessary, you can take a pain reliever. If blisters develop, even after the second day, it is advisable to call the doctor.

First degree burn symptoms

  1. The skin is not broken sometimes swollen skin red or pink discolored, dry skin stinging to painful feeling.

Second degree burn

  1. A distinction is made between a superficial second degree burn and a deep second degree burn, but the difference is difficult to tell. If the skin is broken or blisters appear, you should take it to the doctor anyway. Cooling the wound for about 10 minutes with lukewarm water is always the first step. Second-degree burns take from a few days to five weeks to heal.

Superficial second degree burn symptoms

  1. The epidermis is damaged up to the dermis shiny, rose-red skin wet blisters painful feels smooth

Deep second degree burn symptoms

  1. The dermis is more affected than with a superficial second degree burn red-white color wet blisters painful feels smooth

Third degree burn

  1. With a third degree burn, both the epidermis and the dermis are completely damaged down to the subcutaneous fat tissue. Such a burn hardly hurts because the nerves are affected. There is often a painful second degree wound around it. You should always call a doctor for a third degree burn. In most cases, a skin graft is required.

Third degree burn symptoms

  1. Both the epidermis and the dermis are completely damaged down to the subcutaneous fat tissue white, beige to dark brown in color dry, leathery hardly painful stiff

Fourth degree burn?

  1. The Dutch Burns Foundation speaks of three different degrees of burns. However, some experts also speak of a fourth degree burn. The term carbonization is also used for this. The combustion is so deep that even bone and muscle tissue are destroyed. The appearance of the skin is usually charred, cooked (pale) or raw. Usually, fourth degree burns are fatal.

Treatment of burns

  1. Cooling is the first action you take with a burn. Further treatment depends on the location, size and depth of the burn. If you don't trust it, consult a doctor.

  2. Cooling is the first action you take in case of a burn. Further treatment depends on the location, size and depth of the burn. If you don't trust it, consult a doctor.



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