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Do-it-yourself bread: tasty and healthy

  1. If you bake your own bread, you know exactly what's in it. Whole wheat flour, of course, and no preservatives. Healthy, tasty and fun to do too. In this article not only tips for the home baker, but also four delicious bread recipes.

  1. Baking bread is not complicated. Those who prefer not to deal with dusty flour and sticky dough can use a bread maker. Then it is a matter of adding all the ingredients, setting the timer and ready. Handicrafts take some time, but those who are well organized will bake bread between the soup and the potatoes. And you don't need more than a scale, an oven and two clean hands.

  2. Baking bread is not complicated. Those who prefer not to bother with dusty flour and sticky dough can use a bread maker. Then it's just a matter of adding all the ingredients, setting the timer and you're done. Handicraft takes some time, but if you are well organized, you can bake bread between the soup and the potatoes. And you don't need more than a scale, an oven and two clean hands.

Smooth bowel movements

  1. Wholemeal bread boosts health, like all cereals. The fibers are especially beneficial. Full wheat flour is about 14 percent fiber; rye flour even for 20 percent. These fibers are mainly in the bran, but they also come from the wall of the cells in which the starch is stored. Bran is largely indigestible, but it contains many bioactive components, minerals and trace elements that help control the metabolism. Dietary fiber is not broken down in the small intestine, but is partially or completely fermented by bacteria in the colon. They absorb a lot of water, which makes them feel full after eating. It also increases the speed at which the food mass passes the gut and the size of the stool. Both facets help prevent constipation.

  2. Wholemeal bread boosts health, like all cereals. The fibers are especially beneficial. Full wheat flour is about 14 percent fiber; rye flour even for 20 percent. These fibers are mainly in the bran, but they also come from the wall of the cells in which the starch is stored. Bran is largely indigestible, but it contains many bioactive components, minerals and trace elements that help control the metabolism. Dietary fiber is not broken down in the small intestine, but is partially or completely fermented by bacteria in the colon. They absorb a lot of water, which ensures a satiated feeling after eating. It also increases the speed at which the food mass passes through the gut and the size of the stool. Both facets help prevent constipation.

Cholesterol

  1. The digestible fiber reduces the concentration of total cholesterol in the blood; also that of the bad LDL cholesterol. They ensure that less sugars are absorbed from the broken down starch, so that an insulin peak is less likely to occur. And they provide a buffer for aggressive acids in the stomach. All this contributes to a reduction in the risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, colon cancer and diverticulitis (bulges on the intestinal wall) and to a reduction in the risk of death. Every day we should eat 25 to 30 grams of digestible dietary fiber. Eating whole wheat bread will help you achieve that goal.

  2. The digestible fiber lowers the concentration of total cholesterol in the blood; also that of the bad LDL cholesterol. They ensure that less sugars are absorbed from the broken down starch, so that an insulin peak is less likely to occur. And they provide a buffer for aggressive acids in the stomach. All this contributes to a reduction in the risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, colon cancer and diverticulitis (bulges on the intestinal wall) and to a reduction in the risk of death. Every day we should eat 25 to 30 grams of digestible dietary fiber. Eating whole wheat bread will help you achieve that goal.

Whole wheat flour

  1. Flour mills often first separate all the fragments of the flour (the flour, the germ, the bran), because they mainly produce refined white flour. The 'wholemeal flour' is then reassembled from the fragments, with or without additional additives. This rarely, if ever, yields the original composition, and the label on the bread provides little clarity about this. If the label says 'whole grain', it means that all the constituents of the cereal in question are in the natural ratio, but not whether the grain has been processed. With ready-to-use bread, baking or flour mixes and their impressive list of additives, you often don't know exactly what you're buying either, although they can be quite good. Fortunately, you can still buy real whole wheat flour that contains all the healthy components at various places in the country. Think of the organic shop or directly at the mill.

  2. Flour mills often first separate all the fragments of the flour (the flour, the germ, the bran), because they mainly produce refined white flour. The 'wholemeal flour' is then reassembled from the fragments, with or without additional additives. This rarely, if ever, yields the original composition, and the label on the bread provides little clarity about this. If the label says 'whole grain', it means that all the constituents of the cereal in question are in the natural ratio, but not whether the grain has been processed. With ready-to-use bread, baking or flour mixes and their impressive list of additives, you often don't know exactly what you're buying either, although they can be quite good. Fortunately, you can still buy real wholemeal flour that contains all the healthy components in various places in the country. Think of the organic shop or directly at the mill.

Gluten makes it fluffy

  1. Wheat is the most important grain for bread, because it contains a lot of gluten. Gluten are proteins that form an elastic dough during kneading and in contact with water, which retains the fermentation gases that make the dough rise and yield a light bread. Rye, spelled, oats and corn are also often made into bread, but contain less gluten than wheat.

Spelled

  1. Spelled is often said to be healthier, but scientific research does not show that. The whole spelled flour contains more (unsaturated) fats and minerals than wheat, probably originating from the thin membrane around the starch core, and 40 percent less phytic acid. But the question is whether this is important for nutritional value. Overall, the differences between wheat and spelled are limited. In addition, spelled also contains gluten, although less, which is just as harmful as wheat to those who react poorly to it. There is a difference for the baker. The gluten of spelled, as well as oats and corn, is less robust, resulting in a weaker dough.

Less yeast, more minerals

  1. Another aspect of wholemeal bread that is regularly discussed is the phytate (or phytic acid) of the bran, which is said to inhibit the absorption of a variety of minerals and trace elements. But there are serious doubts as to whether that influence is really that negative. Part of the phytic acid is broken down by yeast or sourdough during the rising of the bread. If you want less phytic acid in the bread, you should let the dough rise slowly at a slightly lower temperature, and use less yeast or sourdough. As a result, more minerals and trace elements are ultimately available for absorption in wholemeal bread than in the original dough.

Rising behind the TV

  1. To make good bread it is crucial that the dough rises well. Anyone who bakes at home must learn through damage and shame which place is most suitable for this. Every house used to have a warm corner by the stove or the fireplace. Modern alternatives: the heat of a television or a computer. Beware of drafts. This can cause the temperature of the dough to drop and it can also dry out. The rising process can then stop. One degree difference in temperature makes a 10 percent difference in rice time. Using too much yeast to make the bread rise faster is also a common mistake. That is not good for the taste. Three hours of rising time before the dough goes into the oven also helps keep the concentration of phytates low.

Bake them brown

  1. As soon as the temperature of the top of the dough rises above 110Â ° C, a nice crust can form. From then on, watch out, because above 200 ° C the top will burn or carbonize. After baking, beat the bottom of the bread: if it doesn't sound hollow enough, slide it back into the heat.

Enjoy healthy 4 times:

  1. Nut bread with fruits Bread with spring onions Focaccia with olives Corn rolls with cheese



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