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The healing power of Rosehip

  1. Rose hip has been used by mankind for millennia for its nutritional and medicinal properties. The fact that only recently science has given names to the substance vitamin C, which is rich in rose hip, does not alter the fact that it was a much-tested medicine in previous centuries. Both the fruit and the seeds were used as a basis for medicine. Rose petals, which are a culinary treat in a salad, were also used. The main medicinal use today is against arthritis, osteoarthritis and for strengthening the body as the many vitamins make fatigue disappear.

Rose hip naming

  1. The botanical name for the rose hip shrub is Rosa Canina; that means 'Rose of the Dog' or 'Dog Rose'. The plant would be so called because the root was used to treat bites from mad dogs. Dutch

  2. The botanical name for the rose hip shrub is Rosa Canina; that means 'Rose of the Dog' or 'Dog Rose'. The plant would be so called because the root was used to treat bites of mad dogs. Dutch

Rose in ancient times

  1. In England a 2000 year old corpse was excavated in which rose hip seeds were found. This indicates that rose hip has been eaten for at least 2,000 years. Remains of wild rose hips were found in pots and trash pits from thousands of years ago. The rose has traditionally been a much used plant. Rosaries were woven in ancient Egypt long before the Roman Catholic Church instructed their followers to use a beaded necklace called the rosary in order to bind themselves to the church institution. The ancient Persians cultivated the first rose. From Persia the rose spread to Mesopotamia, Palestine and then arrived in Europe via ancient Greece. The Ancient Romans

  2. In England a 2000 year old corpse was excavated in which rose hip seeds were found. This indicates that rose hip has been eaten for at least 2,000 years. Remains of wild rose hips were found in pots and trash pits from thousands of years ago. The rose has traditionally been a much used plant. Rosaries were woven in ancient Egypt long before the Roman Catholic Church instructed their followers to use a beaded necklace called the rosary in order to bind themselves to the church institution. The ancient Persians cultivated the first rose. From Persia the rose spread to Mesopotamia, Palestine and then arrived in Europe via Ancient Greece. The Ancient Romans

Renaissance English botanists

  1. John Gerard was an English botanist and herbalist from the 16th century who, among other things, maintained a large herb garden in London. He regarded rose hips as a culinary delicacy with many uses. Nicholas Culpeper, an English herbalist, wrote in the 17th century that you could dip bread in rose water to apply it to the eyes that were red-rimmed. It also helped inflamed and bloodshot eyes, according to Culpeper. In herbal medicine it is still used as an eye bath against conjunctivitis. Culpeper also said that rose water has a cooling effect and strengthens the heart. Culpeper wrote a lengthy book in his day called The Complete Herball. He also mentioned the following effects of rose hip: with a cold, cough, indigestion

  2. John Gerard was an English botanist and herbalist from the 16th century who, among other things, maintained a large herb garden in London. He regarded rose hips as a culinary delicacy with many uses. Nicholas Culpeper, an English herbalist wrote in the 17th century that you could dip bread in rose water and apply it to the eyes that were red-rimmed. It also helped inflamed and bloodshot eyes, according to Culpeper. In herbal medicine it is still used as an eye bath against conjunctivitis. Culpeper also said that rose water has a cooling effect and strengthens the heart. Culpeper wrote a lengthy book in his day called The Complete Herball. He also mentioned the following effects of rose hip: with a cold, cough, indigestion

Rose syrup from the rose hips or the leaves

  1. Just before the Second World War broke out, scientists discovered that rose hip is rich in vitamin C. In addition, it was discovered that it also contained vitamins A, B and the mineral potassium. Not long afterwards, syrups were made from rose hip with a resistance-improving character. This syrup was initially medicinal in nature and later found a permanent place on the supermarket shelves in a weakened form. In addition to the common cold, it also tackled indigestion, stomach and menstrual cramps, diarrhea and nausea. Rose syrup is a diuretic for kidney problems. Nowadays the real, original rose syrup is made from rose petals in the Netherlands

  2. Just before the outbreak of the Second World War, scientists discovered that rose hip is rich in vitamin C. In addition, it was discovered that it also contained vitamins A, B and the mineral potassium. Not long afterwards, syrups were made from rose hip with a resistance-improving character. This syrup was initially medicinal in nature and later found a permanent place on supermarket shelves in a weakened form. In addition to a cold, it tackled indigestion, stomach and menstrual cramps, diarrhea and nausea. Rose syrup is a diuretic for kidney problems. Nowadays the real, original rose syrup is made from rose petals in the Netherlands

Active ingredients rose hip

  1. The rose hip contains many different phytonutrients. Vitamin C is one of the most important ingredients in this fruit. There is relatively 10 times as much vitamin C in a rose hip as in orange. In terms of flavonoids, it contains rutin, isoquercitrin, catechin and epicatechin, among others. It contains special glycolipid; a glycoside derivative of mono- and diglycerol. It also contains the fruit acids malic acid, citric acid and malonic acid. Other nutrients contained in this fruit are: tannins, anthocyanins, carbohydrates, pectin, fibers, the carotenoids beta-carotene, lycopene, zeaxanthin and isomers of rubixanthin, lutein and beta-cryptoxanthin, vitamins B1, B2, B3, B5, K, E and the minerals calcium, potassium, phosphorus, iron, boron, chlorine, chromium, copper, magnesium, silicon, sulfur and zinc

  2. The rose hip contains many different phytonutrients. Vitamin C is one of the most important ingredients in this fruit. There is relatively 10 times as much vitamin C in a rose hip as in orange. In terms of flavonoids, it contains rutin, isoquercitrin, catechin and epicatechin, among others. It contains special glycolipid; a glycoside derivative of mono- and diglycerol. It also contains the fruit acids malic acid, citric acid and malonic acid. Other nutrients that are housed in this fruit are: tannins, anthocyanins, carbohydrates, pectin, fiber, the carotenoids beta-carotene, lycopene, zeaxanthin and isomers of rubixanthin, lutein and beta-cryptoxanthin, vitamins B1, B2, B3, B5, K, E and the minerals calcium, potassium, phosphorus, iron, boron, chlorine, chromium, copper, magnesium, silicon, sulfur and zinc

Rosehip as a tonic

  1. Because the vitamin C in rose hip is taken in combination with flavonoids, it is a more absorbable type of vitamin C than synthetically manufactured ascorbic acid, of which it is not legally prohibited under the name of vitamin C as a supplement to sell to consumers. Due to the healthy effects of vitamin C, it is a tonic, a strengthening agent and a stimulant. It is also an anti-anemic; a medicine for anemia. Because of these medicinal properties, rose hip or products containing rose hip can be recommended by a herbalist for the following indications: Rose hip / Source: Júlio Reis, Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA-2.5) Fatigue due to vitamin deficiency, Prevention of vitamin deficiency, Spring cure, spring cure, recovery after surgery or serious illness, Prevention of aging symptoms, Support during pregnancy and lactation; to breastfeed, Growing children, Anemia or anemia, Prevention of scurvy, Gum disease, Bleeding gums, thrush.

Rosehip as resistance enhancer

  1. Not only vitamin C but also beta-carotene, flavonoids, catechin and minerals strengthen the immune system. This gives a better resistance to diseases. Substances in rose hip trap free radicals, which if they occur in too great a number in the body for many diseases, including the dreaded lifestyle diseases

Rose hips for osteoarthritis and arthritis

  1. As with most natural products, vitamins will evaporate when stored. You can keep rose hips for a maximum of one year; which is good because after a year there are new fruits on the bush. Scientific research indicates that if an arthritis patient eats rose hips for three weeks, there is an 82% chance of less pain. The need for painkillers is decreasing. This is because vitamin C and flavonoids that support the vitamin C effect provide an anti-inflammatory effect. It is also a strong antioxidant

Consult the herbalist

  1. Anyone who wants to use rose hips as a medicinal product is recommended to consult a herbalist. Rose hip extracts and medicines in the form of mother tinctures, powders, nebulisate, liquid extract and capsules should only be taken on prescription by authorized persons. A phytotherapist can inform you about this, as well as about the possible side effects and interactions with medicines or herbs. All medicinal activities mentioned in this article are based on scientific research and come from Geert Verhelst's Great Handbook of Medicinal Plants, a standard work in the field of healing plants. The book is used in phytotherapy.



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