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The male reproductive system

  1. The penis and balls are probably the most famous stars of the male reproductive system. Of course you can't see much more from the outside. However, there is still a lot going on in the male body before sperm from the balls leave the body through the penis.

  1. The main male reproductive functions are sperm formation, sexual intercourse and the maintenance of sexual function via hormones. Different sexual organs are involved both internally and externally.

Penis

  1. The penis plays two important roles for reproduction. First of all, it makes sexual intercourse possible thanks to the cavernous bodies. In addition, he transports the sperm cells to the woman via the urethra. In addition to the cavernous bodies and urethra, the glans penis, also called glans, is an important part. In general, it is exposed with an erection. Stimulation of the glans can lead to orgasm and ejaculation (ejaculation). The penis of an adult man is relaxed on average 9.8 centimeters and when erect it averages 14.8 centimeters.

Seed balls (testes)

  1. The scrotum, also called the scrotum, is a flap of skin that hangs between the penis, legs and anus. The two testes are located in this pocket-shaped fold of skin. A testicle has an oval shape and is 4 to 5 inches long. Because the testes hang outside the body, the temperature is somewhat lower. This benefits the quality of sperm. Each testicle consists of approximately 200 to 300 lobes, which in turn consist of several test tubes. Sperm cells and cells that produce the male hormone testosterone and small amounts of estrogens develop in these tubes. The mature sperm cells are transported to the epididymis via a network of channels.

Epidials (epididymis)

  1. Behind each testicle is an epididymis. This organ has the shape of a comma and consists of a completely coiled tube of no less than 5 meters. Channels of the testes open into this tube. The sperm cells mature further in the epididymis. For example, they develop the ability to swim and to bind to the female egg. Mature sperm cells are stored in the epididymides for about 2 to 3 weeks. If no ejaculation follows, they are then broken off.

Sperm conductor (ductus deferens)

  1. A vas deferens emerges from each epididymis, this tube is about 50 to 60 centimeters long. The vas deferens connects the epididymis to the urethra. To do this, he first goes through the groin and then with a large bend towards the prostate. Behind the prostate, the vas deferens meet with the drainage of the seminal vesicles. The two vas deferens together form the ejaculatory duct. This tube passes through the prostate and opens into the urethra.

Seminal vesicles (vesiculae seminales)

  1. The seminal vesicles are glands that produce semen fluid. About 70 percent of the semen consists of this. The thick, slightly basic fluid contains, among other things, fructose, the hormone prostaglandin and the protein fibrinogen. The alkaline moisture allows sperm to survive in the acidic environment of the vagina. The fructose is an energy source and the prostaglandin increases mobility. Fibrinogen contributes to the thickening of the semen after ejaculation. The seminal vesicles are about 5 inches long and are pyramid-shaped. Both seminal vesicles open into the vas deferens just above the prostate.

Prostate

  1. The prostate is located just below the bladder outlet and around the urethra. It consists of billions of small tubes that together produce prostatic fluid. When you orgasm, the sperm cells are pumped to the prostate. There they are mixed with the prostatic fluid (about 25 percent of the semen consists of prostatic fluid). When ejaculating, the prostate contracts and the semen is forced out through the urethra. At the same time, the bladder is closed, so that your sperm cells cannot enter your bladder.

Cowper's Glands

  1. Before the sperm cells reach the urethra, Cowper's glands first secrete pre-cum. The mucus from these glands neutralizes the urethra. This is because residual urine can kill the sperm cells. The pre-moisture also forms a good-working lubricant. Cowper's glands are located at the root of the penis.

  2. Before the sperm cells reach the urethra, Cowper's glands first secrete pre-cum. The mucus from these glands neutralizes the urethra. This is because residual urine can kill the sperm cells. The pre-moisture also forms a good-working lubricant. The kli



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