Filter
Reset
Sort ByRelevance
vegetarianvegetarian
Reset
  • Ingredients
  • Diets
  • Allergies
  • Nutrition
  • Techniques
  • Cuisines
  • Time
Without


The difference between vegan and vegetarian

  1. Vegan food has a long history: once reserved only for peace-loving hippies, interest in a completely animal-free diet has now reached a new high with even celebrities like Bill Clinton, Alicia Silverstone, Jay Z and Beyoncé who made it their lifestyle.

  2. Vegan food has a long history: once only reserved for peace-loving hippies, interest in a completely animal-free diet has now reached a new height with celebrities like Bill Clinton, Alicia Silverstone, Jay Z and Beyoncé who made it their lifestyle.

  1. Many people may not know the difference between a vegan and a vegetarian, and when it comes to things other than nutrition, it can get even more confusing.

What is a vegetarian?

  1. While most of us don't like to be pigeonholed, the name vegetarian or vegan clearly lets others know their way of life.

  1. It sounds a lot like being judged when asked if you are a vegetarian or vegan and in some cases you probably are. So let's get some things together and see what we can learn.

  2. It sounds a lot like being judged when asked if you are a vegetarian or vegan and in some cases you probably are. So let's get a few things straight and see what we can learn.

  1. A vegetarian is someone who does not eat meat. If they don't eat meat for health reasons, they are referred to as a nutritional vegetarian. Those who avoid meat out of respect for the environment or animals are called "ethical vegetarians." The term “lacto-ovo-vegetarian” is also sometimes used to indicate that the person does eat dairy and eggs.

  2. A vegetarian is someone who does not eat meat. If they do not eat meat for health reasons, they are referred to as a nutritional vegetarian. Those who avoid meat out of respect for the environment or animals are called "ethical vegetarians." The term “lacto-ovo-vegetarian” is also sometimes used to indicate that the person does eat dairy and eggs.

  1. Anyone who does not eat meat, including vegans, lacto-vegetarians, ovo-vegetarians and lacto-ovo vegetarians, is considered a vegetarian. A vegetarian diet is sometimes referred to as a meatless or meat-free diet.

  1. Vegetarians do not eat meat derived from animals. While some people use the terms “pesco-vegetarian” to refer to someone who eats fish or “pollo-vegetarian” to refer to someone who eats chicken, they are not vegetarians. Likewise, a flexitarian - someone who eats vegetarian some of the time but eats meat at other times - is not a vegetarian.

  1. And let's be clear about this, animal meat includes fish and shellfish.

What is a vegan?

  1. There was a time when vegans were really considered radical and sometimes even far “beyond”. Actually, some still are. It may seem like vegans sacrifice a lot, but the truth is that for ethical vegans it's really no big deal at all. Vegans do not use animal products such as meat, fish, poultry, eggs, dairy, honey or gelatin. Vegans are therefore often asked what to eat if they cannot eat meat. A good answer to this is let me tell you what they shouldn't eat because that list is much shorter than the list of things they can eat. Of course, vegans eat grains, beans, nuts, fruits, vegetables and seeds. While the diet may seem very limited compared to the standard European diet, they really don't just eat salads. A look at vegan gourmet foods should convince everyone that a vegan diet can be delicious and filling.

  2. There was a time when vegans were considered to be truly radical and sometimes even far “beyond”. Actually, some still are. It may seem like vegans sacrifice a lot, but the truth is, for ethical vegans, it's really not an issue at all. Vegans do not use animal products such as meat, fish, poultry, eggs, dairy, honey, or gelatin. Vegans are therefore often asked what to eat if they cannot eat meat. A good answer to this is, let me tell you what they shouldn't eat because that list is much shorter than the list of things they can eat. Of course, vegans eat grains, beans, nuts, fruits, vegetables and seeds. While the diet may seem very limited compared to the standard European diet, they really don't just eat salads. A look at vegan gourmet foods should convince everyone that a vegan diet can be delicious and filling.

  1. Veganism is much more than just a diet.

  1. Although the word 'vegan' can refer to a cuisine or a particular dish and mean no animal products in the diet, when referring to a person, the word also something else. A person who is vegan is generally viewed as one who refrains from using animal products for animal rights and other reasons. A vegan may also be concerned about the environment and their own health, but the main reason for their veganism is their belief in animal rights. Veganism is a lifestyle and philosophy that recognizes that animals too have the right to be free from human use and exploitation. Veganism is an ethical attitude.

  2. Although the word 'vegan' can refer to a cuisine or a particular dish and mean no animal products in the diet, when referring to a person, the word also means something else. A person who is vegan is generally seen as one who refrains from using animal products for animal rights and other reasons. A vegan may also be concerned about the environment and their own health, but the main reason for their veganism is their belief in animal rights. Veganism is a lifestyle and philosophy that recognizes that animals too have the right to be free from human use and exploitation. Veganism is an ethical attitude.

  1. Because veganism is mainly about recognizing the rights of animals, it is not just about food.

  1. Vegans also avoid silk, wool, leather and suede in their clothing. Vegans also boycott animal testing companies and do not purchase cosmetics or personal care products that contain lanolin, carmine, honey and other animal products. Zoos, rodeos, greyhound and horse races and circuses with animals are also not correct in the eyes of a vegan because of the oppression of the animals.

  2. Vegans also avoid silk, wool, leather and suede in their clothing. Vegans also boycott companies that test on animals and do not purchase cosmetics or personal care products that contain lanolin, carmine, honey, and other animal products. Zoos, rodeos, greyhound and horse races and circuses with animals are also not correct in the eyes of a vegan because of the oppression of the animals.

  1. Some people, including former US President Bill Clinton, also eat a diet that is completely or nearly free of animal products for health reasons. In these cases, the person is usually said to be on a plant-based diet. Some also use the term “strictly vegetarian” to describe someone who does not eat animal products but can use animal products in other areas of their life, but this term is problematic because it implies that lacto-ovo are vegetarians. so don't be 'strict' vegetarians.

  1. When it comes to nutrition, the main difference between vegans and vegetarians is whether or not they eat eggs, dairy and honey. But again veganism is about so much more than just nutrition.

  1. But before you immerse yourself in a meat-, egg- and dairy-free life, you need to know what you're getting into. Here are 12 things to expect when you go vegan.

You must take a B12 supplement

  1. Vitamin B12 is naturally only found in animal foods so you will need to start using various B12-fortified foods and a B12 supplement. B12 keeps the body's nerves and blood cells healthy and it helps make DNA, so deficiencies in it can lead to fatigue, weakness, constipation, loss of appetite, weight loss (the bad kind), nerve problems, and even depression. To find out if you should increase your intake, ask your doctor for a simple blood test.

... And maybe you should also take an iron supplement

  1. Iron comes in two forms: heme and non-heme. Heme, which makes up about 40% of the iron in animal foods, is easily absorbed by the body. Vegan diets contain only non-heme iron, which is less likely to be absorbed, so you may need to increase your intake of iron if you want the benefits. Good vegan iron sources are legumes, sunflower seeds, dried raisins and dark leafy greens. Vitamin C-rich foods (think: red peppers, citrus, and broccoli) help promote iron absorption.

Your friends and family will be asking a lot of questions

  1. People are very sensitive when it comes to their diet, especially when you start to question what they have always believed. The best way to minimize conflict is to emphasize that you are becoming or are a vegan for your own reasons and that it seems to work for you. In other words, make it personal so that no one feels they have to defend their choices.

You will need to find new protein sources

  1. Every meal should contain protein. Proteins are the building blocks of life: they are broken down into amino acids that promote cell growth and repair. It is recommended that adults consume at least 0.8 grams of protein for every kilogram of body weight daily. That is about 54 grams for a woman of around 70 kilos. The best sources of vegan protein are natural soy, lentils, beans, quinoa and seitan.

Don't replace animal products with junk

  1. If you replace meat with bread, pasta and other packaged foods, the vegan diet will be a major failure. It is a very bad idea to exchange animal products, which contain proteins, vitamins and minerals, for processed foods that are low in nutritional value and that are high in calories. The result is hunger, weight gain and a moody mood.

Take it easy on soy products

  1. In general, critics overestimate the dangers of soy and its promoters exaggerate its benefits. While scientists still argue about soy's effects on cancer and heart health, one thing is certain: Consuming too much soy-based vegan 'meat' is arguably worse (than) consuming animal high quality products. Meat substitutes are often highly processed and packed with sodium and preservatives, so read the labels of the products you buy carefully. The healthiest sources of soy are miso, tempeh, tofu, soy milk and edamame.

You don't have to switch immediately in one go

  1. You don't just wake up vegan one morning. It takes some effort, so give yourself time. Start adding more plant foods to your diet, while cutting back on animal products, especially those that aren't organic, and more importantly, slowly cutting out processed refined foods from your diet. It's important to make gradual changes and assess how you feel.

Be prepared to read food labels

  1. If you want to be a serious vegan, checking food labels and verifying ingredients is a must. Not only because it says vegan on a product, it also means that it is suitable for a vegan diet. Casein and whey, which come from milk, are present in many cereal bars, breads and granolas, while gelatin and tallow (also known as suet) come from meat. Then there is E120 (also known as carminic acid, cochineal, or cochineal extract), a food coloring made from the dried bodies of female beetles. The list of E numbers and what they mean can help you with this.

You may feel happier

  1. Animals won't be the only ones happy with your vegan lifestyle. You yourself will be much happier too. One reason why: Compared to omnivore diets, vegetarian diets contain more arachidonic acid, which can trigger neurological changes that improve mood.

You don't have to ignore your favorite restaurants

  1. Just as veganism is growing in popularity, nowadays there are vegan options available on virtually all restaurant menus. But always check: even if your favorite dish looks vegan, you can tell the waiter that you have a dietary restriction to make sure no animal products are used to prepare your meal (think hidden butter or chicken stock ).

Vegetable products can cover your calcium needs

  1. The Nutrition Center recommends that adults between the ages of 19 and 50 should get a minimum of 1,000mg of calcium per day, but preliminary research shows that vegans can get by with less too. A study by the European Journal found that vegans consumed about 525 mg of calcium per day, but their fracture risk was no different than non-vegetarians with comparable calcium intakes. The key is to eat a variety of naturally calcium-rich foods such as kale, bok choy, almonds, soybeans, figs and navel oranges, as well as calcium-fortified foods such as cereals, vegetable milks and tofu made with calcium sulfate. [! 192609 => 1140 = 27!] Bonus: soy, leafy greens and most fortified foods are also high in vitamin D, which helps your body absorb calcium better.

  1. Below you will find some tips, in no particular order. Some are practical, some philosophical, but I think they can all be useful.

Start with an 'open mind'

  1. There is no better way to make sure it fails than to start with a bad attitude. Unfortunately, it is quite difficult for many people to be positive about something. If you think that being a vegan is going to be a punishment or that you can't keep it up, you torment yourself and it will almost certainly fail. I hope this whole series of articles has helped at least a few people realize it doesn't have to be.

If you cook at home, give yourself extra time to cook

  1. Especially if you are just starting out. For most people, coming up with 100% vegetable meals will require planning and extra time in the kitchen, and even for a seasoned professional, cooking a vegan meal can take a little longer.

Take a look at your pantry

  1. Is it still full of spices for meat, dried pasta, rice, potatoes and the like? If so, cooking will be a daunting task. Keep your pantry stocked with plenty of beans and whole grains, hearty leafy greens like kale, spinach and mustard greens, and vegan sauces, for example.

Avoid convenience foods

  1. If everything you eat as a vegan is bad frozen pizza, frozen vegan burritos, veggie burger patties, and ready meals, you're not going to be a happy eater. Regular frozen foods are bad enough. Vegan frozen foods are just awful.

Have a look at the products section

  1. Going vegan is the perfect excuse to put all kinds of vegetables in your cart that you've never eaten before. I call it diversity through limitation. As a meat eater, I often made use of the simple options - the steak or the burger - avoiding the often more interesting vegetable-based options. As a vegan, the diet has become much more diverse and, as such, more fun.

Don't be afraid

  1. There has been a time when you start to feel that you had to defend yourself in order to convince others why you are doing what you are doing. On the other hand, when you're just being honest and bluntly saying, "It's something I've always wanted to try because I usually agree with a lot of the vegan philosophy," you end up getting a lot more respect. an interesting discussion and is there the potential to actually influence another person.

When traveling, bring food with you

  1. In fact, you should make sure that snacks or a meal are available at all times. It's not that as a vegan you get hungrier faster (at least, I didn't), it's just that if you miss lunch or forget at home, your options as a vegan on the go or in unfamiliar territory are very meager. Some fresh fruit, a good salad or even a nut mix can be a life saver in those situations.

So you screwed up. Don't give up!

  1. Again, the key to being a successful vegan is to live the lifestyle as much as reasonably possible. There may be some who disagree with this, but if you have realized that you accidentally ate a little butter or that the curry you just tasted contains fish sauce, don't be too hard on yourself. Are you gone for the next few days and do you think it is difficult to get vegan food? Well, don't starve yourself, just do the best you can. The moment a diet is no longer enjoyable, you may start to think it may not be worth it anymore.

Stay strong

  1. The first few days may be difficult, but once you're in the grip of the things you face, it just gets easier and more common.

  1. There will always be people who will not respect a vegan lifestyle. So what? Nobody is perfect.

  1. The best way to teach people is to teach them through practical examples and not by judging them. Bring some vegan food or invite them over for a vegan meal. If you want to make the change and keep your friends while you're at it, you have to realize that not everyone will agree with you and not everyone has the same values ​​as you. [! 192609 => 1140 = 40!] Www.ilovevegan.com/resources/transitioning-to-a-vegan-lifestyle/

  1. Www.vegansociety.com/go-vegan/how-go-vegan

  1. Www.huffingtonpost.fr/matt-frazier/dix-choses-a-savoir-vegan_b_4000949.html



Donate - BNB: bnb16ghhqcjctncdczjpawnl36jduaddx5l4eysm5c