Filter
Reset
Sort ByRelevance
vegetarianvegetarian
Reset
  • Ingredients
  • Diets
  • Allergies
  • Nutrition
  • Techniques
  • Cuisines
  • Time
Without


The Healthiest Vegetable for a Long and Healthy Life

  1. Today there are so many different fruits and vegetables that are marketed as â € œsuperfoodsâ € that people sometimes wonder whether it is still worthwhile to eat products that are not labeled as “super”.

  2. Today there are so many different fruits and vegetables that are marketed as â € œsuperfoodsâ € that people sometimes wonder if it is still worth eat products that are not labeled as “super”.

  1. Today we look at four different vegetables that may receive a little less attention, but certainly deserve a little more attention and certainly fall under the category â € ˜â € ™ healthiest vegetablesâ € ™ â € ™ .

Healthiest Vegetable # 1: Peas

  1. It is not clear exactly why if this is the case, but many people think they should not eat peas because they contain too many calories.

  2. It is not clear exactly why if this is the case, but many people think they shouldn't eat peas because they contain too many calories.

  1. Peas do indeed have a fair amount of calories for vegetables (62.5 calories per ½ cup cooked) but what people often don't realize is that peas are packed with over four grams of fiber and four grams of protein, more than almost any other vegetable.

  2. Peas do indeed have a fair amount of calories for vegetables (62.5 calories per ½ cup cooked) but what people often don't realize is that peas are packed with more than four grams of fiber and four grams of protein, more than almost any other vegetable.

  1. In addition, peas are also an excellent source of vitamins C and K, folic acid, iron, niacin, potassium, and zinc. They are also full of phytonutrients, including flavanols, phenolic acids, and carotenoids.

  1. Archaeologists and historians believe that the garden pea originated in Egypt or China, and that it has been part of our diet for over 5,000 years.

  1. Good for our hearts

  1. Eating peas is also good for improving heart health. In addition to being high in fiber, peas are also high in lutein, with a whopping 1,920 IU per ½ cup. Lutein is a carotenoid A, just like lycopene. It mainly acts as an antioxidant and protects our cells from oxidation.

  2. Eating peas is also good for improving heart health. In addition to being high in fiber, peas are also high in lutein, with a whopping 1,920 IU per ½ cup. Lutein is a carotenoid A, just like lycopene. It primarily acts as an antioxidant and protects our cells from oxidation.

  1. [!Pullquote] Research indicates that people with a higher lutein intake are less likely to suffer from atherosclerosis. [!/ Pullquote]

  1. Both the fiber and lutein in the peas improve our heart health by helping to lower our cholesterol and help reduce plaque build-up along our artery walls.

  1. Good for our eyes

  1. Lutein and vitamin A in peas also protects our eyes. Lutein, a natural vegetable pigment, is mainly found in our eyes. Partly because of this, the extra antioxidants can help protect our eyes against both cataracts and macular degeneration by preventing oxidation. Vitamin A keeps the surface of our eyes healthy.

  1. A ½ cup of peas contains 1,610 IU of vitamin A, more than enough to meet 32 ​​percent of our daily value for vitamin A. Daily recommendations for lutein have not been established.]

  2. A ½ cup of green peas contains 1,610 IU of vitamin A, more than enough to meet 32 ​​percent of our daily value for vitamin A. Daily recommendations for lutein have not been established.]

  1. Good source of iron

  1. Peas can also help us get the daily amount of iron needed. A ½ cup contains 1.2 mg of iron. Most of the iron we consume is found in hemoglobin, the protein responsible for transporting oxygen throughout our body.

  1. Insufficient iron intake decreases the supply of oxygen, making you feel tired more quickly, having a reduced ability to concentrate, and also increasing our risk of infection.

  1. We need different amounts of iron depending on both age and gender. Men and women over the age of 51 need to get 8 mg of iron per day, and women between the ages of 19 and 50 need 18 mg per day. Women of childbearing age have a higher need for iron than men and older women due to menstruation.

  1. Peas can be eaten on their own, or added to pasta sauce, brown rice, or a salad to give it some extra nutrients and flavor. Although the amount of calories is quite high, it is still important not to leave peas completely off the plate.

Healthiest Vegetable # 2: White Cabbage

  1. Cabbage, you don't hear people talking about it much unless it is about the â € ˜ Cabbage Soup Dietâ € ™. Many older people used to eat a lot of cabbage as children, but nowadays eat less and less.

  2. Cabbage, you don't hear people talking about it much unless it is about the â € Cabbage Soup Dietâ € ™. Many older people used to eat a lot of cabbage as children, but nowadays eat less and less.

  1. This while it is a good source of potassium, calcium and vitamins C and K. In addition, cabbage also contains omega-3 fats in the little fat it contains.

  1. About ½ cup has only 16.5 calories and still 1.5 grams of fiber, meaning you can eat a lot of cabbage without worrying about putting on a lot come. Cabbage provides various nutritional benefits that positively affect our body.

  1. However, research has shown that steamed cabbage is healthier (contains more antioxidants) than raw or cooked cabbage.

  1. Eating cabbage significantly increases our daily vitamin C intake. Vitamin C is especially important for healthy bones, healthy skin, our mucous membranes, and a strong immune system. Since vitamin C is water soluble, this means that it is not stored in our body, so we have to get it every day.

  1. A ½ cup of cooked cabbage contains 28.1 mg of vitamin C, which is a whopping 47 percent of the recommended daily allowance. A whole cup of raw cabbage provides us with a whopping 32.6 mg, or 54 percent of our recommended daily intake. Whether you eat it cooked or raw, cabbage makes a significant contribution to vitamin C.

  1. Cabbage is extremely high in vitamin K, which is an advantage for many people, but a disadvantage for some. Vitamin K is known as the “coagulation vitamin,” it keeps you from bleeding to death the moment you cut yourself or get injured.

  1. In addition, vitamin K also has a positive influence on the prevention of osteoporosis, fractures, cardiovascular diseases and strokes. However, if someone is already taking blood thinners then it is not a good idea to consume a lot more charcoal as the blood could become much too thin.

  1. Protective fabrics

  1. Cabbage contains flavonoid compounds that help protect the body against cancer and other diseases, according to researchers at the University of Seville. A study published in April 2011 found that cabbage contains kaempferol, an anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, anti-allergenic, and antioxidant compound that reduces the risk of heart problems, diabetes, and cancer.

  1. Another protective compound is sulforaphane, which helps protect the body against oxidative damage, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and diabetes. In addition to C and K, cabbage also contains the entire B vitamin family, with the exception of B-12, and traces of vitamins A and E.

  1. Other minerals found in coal are manganese, calcium, potassium, magnesium, phosphorus, iron, zinc, copper, and selenium. Cabbage also contains a fair amount of fiber, which keeps you full and can therefore aid in weight loss.

  1. You can enjoy cabbage in many different ways, for example you can use it in a soup, in a salad, or maybe stir-fry with other vegetables and some shrimp.

Healthiest Vegetable # 3: Corn

  1. Another vegetable that many people think has too many calories (cooked corn contains 77.5 calories per ½ cup). Remember, the corn itself is not unhealthy, but the amount of butter and other things people put on it WILL be unhealthy. Corn is packed with fiber (3 grams) and protein (12.6 grams) and is also rich in antioxidants, especially carotenoids.

  1. The amount of folic acid in corn at a serving of about 1 cup is 61 mcg, which is 15 percent of the daily requirement. Folate is a B vitamin responsible for enzyme metabolism and DNA synthesis. Folic acid deficiency can lead to fetal brain and spinal cord deformities.

  1. Women who become pregnant should ensure that they meet folic acid requirements in the first month of conception to avoid birth defects.

  1. One serving of corn provides 3 grams of fiber, which is 12 percent of what we need every day. Fiber is an important nutrient that regulates digestion, maintains healthy blood sugar, and absorbs excess cholesterol, helping to drastically lower our risk of cardiovascular disease. One serving of corn contributes to the five to nine daily servings of fruits and vegetables recommended.

  1. Try a corn on the cob cooked on the grill. Wrap the corn in aluminum foil with a little oil - no more butter is needed here. You can also throw corn in a salad with black beans and tomatoes.

  1. If you choose to buy canned corn, buy the low-salt version of canned corn, which is extra easy to store and you can always rinse the corn with water to remove any excess sodium before cooking.

Healthiest Vegetable # 4: Cauliflower

  1. Ever since many experts told people to fill their plates with color, plain white products have gotten a bad name. But in the case of cauliflower, this is absolutely undeserved.

  1. As a member of the finial family, cauliflower has many of the same nutritional values ​​as broccoli, kale, or white cabbage, including its cancer-fighting antioxidants. Cauliflower's mild flavor makes it easy to use in soups, stews, and curries. You can serve cauliflower raw, steamed, baked, or sautéed.

  1. Cauliflower is usually white, but orange and purple shapes are also available. Purple cauliflower cooks faster and tastes a bit sweeter than other cauliflowers - the florets of these turn green when cooked.

  1. Anti-Cancer Compounds

  1. Cruciferous vegetables such as cauliflower have some of the highest cancer-fighting potential of any food. Cauliflower, broccoli, cabbage and other cruciferous vegetables contain glucosinolates, the sulfur compounds that provide their unique flavor profile.

  1. The body processes glucosinolates into isothicyanates or ICTs. According to experts, ITCs remove carcinogens from the body, cause cancer cells to die, and also reduce the growth of tumors.

  1. Although oranges always get the spotlight (and are often put on the vitamin bottles), cauliflower certainly has something to offer when it comes to vitamin C. One cup of cauliflower, about one-sixth of an average cauliflower, contains 100 percent of the daily amount of vitamin C. Vitamin C boosts the immune system, improves iron absorption, and helps maintain healthy teeth, gums, and blood vessels.]

  1. Beta-carotene

  1. To be fair, traditional cauliflower contains very little beta-carotene, but the orange version is full of it. Orange cauliflower is the result of a random, natural mutation of white cauliflower, a mutation discovered in Canada. This mutation contains carotenoids, the same compounds that we find in carrots, these carotenoids are responsible for the high beta-carotene content in carrots.

  1. Beta-carotene supplies the body with vitamin A and may also help improve cardiovascular health and fight cancer. Orange cauliflower is usually smaller than white cauliflower. They may only be available in certain seasons or in specialty markets.

  1. Buying and preparing cauliflower

  1. Provide a firm head with no discoloration. The leaves around the cauliflower should be green and not withering. You can store a whole cauliflower for about a week, but once you start cutting into it, the cauliflower will really break down faster.

  1. To properly clean cauliflower, first tear off the leaves and then carefully cut off the stem with a sharp knife. Then you can start cutting individual florets from the bottom of the cauliflower.

  1. Rinse the florets with water before using them anywhere. Try roasted cauliflower, mashed like a soup, or mashed instead of potatoes.

  1. So what's the ultimate moral of the story when it comes to vegetables? Just choose the one you want. Just because something is labeled a "superfood" doesn't necessarily mean you'll like it. The ultimate goal with vegetables is that you do eat them. As you can see, these four examples are also very good for you.

  1. Remember that variation is especially important when selecting vegetables. Alternate with broccoli, spinach, sauerkraut and leafy green vegetables to get the right amount of vitamins and minerals!

  1. Besides these 4 â € ˜â € ™ healthiest vegetablesâ € ™ â € ™ I also recommend looking beyond just vegetables. A well-balanced diet means that you are going to make the right conscious choices. For more tips, I recommend that you read the special on a balanced diet.



Donate - BNB: bnb16ghhqcjctncdczjpawnl36jduaddx5l4eysm5c