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Activating your intestines with resistant starch

  1. Today we are all looking for the magic pill that will help us achieve overall health, stimulate weight loss and make us simply feel good in our bodies.

  1. There is of course no such pill, but recently science has come a bit closer. There are indications that the 'missing link' that stimulates your health and ensures natural weight loss has finally been found. Again, of course, it is not a magic pill, but rather a nutrient that many of us do not consume on a daily basis, when it should.

  2. There is of course no such pill, but recently science has come a bit closer. There are indications that the 'missing link' that stimulates your health and ensures natural weight loss has finally been found. Again, of course, this is not a magic pill, but rather a nutrient that many of us don't consume on a daily basis, when it should.

Resistant starch

  1. We already knew that fiber is healthy, but the type of fiber that I am going to talk about in the article below is not the same as the fiber that we find in vegetables, fruit or grains.

  1. Resistant starch, or resistant starch, doesn't sound like it falls into the fiber category, and for those of us on a low-carb diet, it probably doesn't sound very healthy either. But the opposite is true.

  1. So what exactly is resistant starch? You will find a brief explanation below.

  1. Most carbohydrates in food consist of starch. Starch is a long chain of glucose found in grains, potatoes and various foods. But not all the starch we eat is digested.

  1. Sometimes a small amount of this passes through the digestive tract without being broken down. In other words, it resists digestion.

  1. This type of starch is called resistant starch, which acts like a type of soluble fiber. Many human studies have shown that resistant starch, RS in short, has powerful health benefits.

  2. This type of starch is called resistant starch, which acts like a kind of soluble fiber. Many human studies have shown that resistant starch, RS in short, has powerful health benefits.

  1. This includes improved insulin sensitivity, lower blood sugar, decreased appetite, and various digestive benefits.

  1. RS is actually a very popular topic in America today. In recent months, hundreds of people have experimented with it by adding it to their diet and have also seen dramatic improvements in their health.

  2. RS is actually a very popular topic in America today. In recent months, hundreds of people have experimented with it by adding it to their diet and have also noticed dramatic improvements in their health.

The different types of resistant starch

  1. Not all types of RS are the same. There are 4 different types.

  1. Â € ¢ Type 1 is found in grains, seeds and legumes and is resistant to digestion as it is bound within the fibrous cell walls. Type 2 is found in some starchy foods, including raw potatoes and green (unripe) bananas. â € ¢ Type 3 is formed when certain starchy foods, such as potatoes and rice, are cooked and then cooled. The cooling ensures that some of the digestible starch is converted into RS through a process called retrogradation. â € ¢ Type 4 is man-made and is formed through a chemical process.

  1. The classification is not that simple, but different types of RS can coexist in the same food. The amount of RS can change depending on how food is cooked. For example, when a banana ripens (yellow) the RS will be broken down and converted into normal starch, which can be digested.

  2. The classification is not that simple, but different types of RS can co-exist in the same food. The amount of RS can change depending on how food is cooked. For example, when a banana ripens (yellow), the RS will be broken down and converted into normal starch, which can be digested.

  1. In short: There are 4 different types of RS. The method of preparation has a major influence on the final amount of RS in food.

How does resistant starch work?

  1. The main reason RS works is because it functions as a soluble, fermentable fiber that activates your gut. It passes through the stomach and small intestine undigested and eventually reaches the large intestine where it feeds the good bacteria in the intestine.

  2. The main reason RS works is because it functions as a soluble, fermentable fiber that activates your gut. It passes through the stomach and small intestine undigested and eventually reaches the large intestine where it feeds the good bacteria in the gut.

  1. The bacteria in the intestine (the intestinal flora) make up 90% of the cells in our body. In that respect we are only 10% human. While most of the foods we eat feed only 10% of our cells, fermentable fiber and RS feed the remaining 90%.

  1. There are actually hundreds of different types of bacteria in your gut. In recent decades, scientists have discovered that the number and nature of bacteria can have a major impact on health.

  1. RS feeds the friendly bacteria in the gut, and thus has a positive effect on the bacterial species and the number. When the bacteria digest RS, they form various compounds, including gases and short chain fatty acids, especially a fatty acid called butyrate.

  1. In short: One of the most important reasons why RS can contribute to your health is because it feeds the good bacteria in the gut and increases the production of certain healthy fatty acids.

Resistant starch: healthy for digestion

  1. So when we eat RS it ends up in the colon, where the bacteria digest it and convert it into good fatty acids, which in turn activates our intestines - but still more importantly our immune system, which goes hand in hand. The most important of these fatty acids is butyrate.

  1. Butyrate is actually the healthiest fuel for the cells that line the gut. Therefore, RS feeds the friendly bacteria and indirectly also the cells in the gut by the amount of butyrate that is produced.

  1. RS has several positive effects on the intestines:

  1. RS lowers pH, can inhibit inflammation, and leads to a number of positive changes that lower the risk of colon cancer, which is one of the most common types of cancer.

  1. The fatty acids not used by the cells in the colon travel to the bloodstream, liver and the rest of the body, where they can contribute to various beneficial effects.

  1. Because of its therapeutic effects on the gut, RS can be useful for a variety of digestive disorders. This includes bowel diseases such as Crohn's disease, constipation, diverticulitis and diarrhea.

  1. Before recommendations can be made, sufficient human studies need to be carried out to underline this. Animal studies have also shown that RS can increase mineral absorption.

  1. However, there is another advantage of RS. Besides the fact that it feeds the bacteria in your intestines, it also provides a greater variety of bacteria. Good health depends on the diversity of your gut flora.

  1. In order to digest all foods as well as possible, you need many different types of bacteria. A deficiency causes you to have to deal with allergies and hypersensitivity.

  1. That is also the reason why many people, for example, cannot digest gluten properly.

  1. With a large variation in your intestinal flora, you can actively improve your health and digest food better, which in turn leads to a better absorption of nutrients. Deficiencies are thus counteracted and your overall health improves.

  1. In short: Through the production of butyrate, RS nourishes the cells of the colon, leading to various improvements in the functioning of the digestive system. RS also ensures a large variation in your intestinal flora, which limits hypersensitivity and nutrients are better absorbed by your body.

Resistant starch and insulin sensitivity

  1. RS has several benefits for a healthy metabolism. Several studies show that it can improve insulin sensitivity, which means that our body's cells respond better to insulin. RS is also very effective in lowering blood sugar after meals.

  1. There is also a "second meal effect" - which means that if you already eat RS at breakfast, it will also lower blood sugar at lunch or increase your blood glucose. limit. This does not only apply to RS, other soluble fibers also have a similar effect. So they make you feel fuller, so you often eat less.

  1. The effect on glucose and insulin is impressive. Some studies have found a 33-50% improvement in insulin sensitivity after 4 weeks of 15-30 grams per day. Insulin sensitivity is of particular concern.

  1. Low insulin sensitivity (insulin resistance) is believed to be a major cause of some of the most serious diseases, including metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular disease and the disease. Alzheimer's.

  1. By improving insulin sensitivity and lowering blood sugar, resistant starch can help prevent chronic disease and thus contribute to a longer life and an improved quality of life. However, not all studies agree that RS has all of these beneficial effects.

  1. Much depends on the individual, dosage and type of RS being used.

  1. In short: Many studies show that RS improves insulin sensitivity and lowers blood sugar, especially after meals.

RS and weight loss

  1. RS has fewer calories than regular starch (2 instead of 4 calories per gram). So the more RS a food contains, the fewer calories it contains. Several studies show that soluble fiber supplements can contribute to weight loss, mainly by increasing the feeling of fullness and reducing appetite.

  1. It appears that RS has the same effect. By adding this fiber to meals, there is a good chance that you will eventually consume fewer calories.

  1. There have been a number of studies in animals that show that RS can support weight loss, but this has not yet been sufficiently investigated in humans. Adding RS to your diet probably won't magically affect your weight, but it can make it easier to lose weight with other methods.

  1. In short: RS or resistant starch has fewer calories than regular starch and can increase feelings of satiety and help people eat less.

Adding Resistant Starch to Your Diet - A Simple Approach

  1. There are two ways to add resistant starch to your diet: either you consume it directly in the form of food or you take it as a supplement. Supplements with this fiber form are not yet widely available in the Netherlands.

  1. America is the forerunner in this field. So if you would like to try it as a supplement, you may be able to go to the American Amazon. Keep in mind that shipping costs will be quite high.

  1. Moreover, supplementation is not necessary at all, because the soluble fiber can also be found in natural foods. Several commonly consumed foods are rich in resistant starch.

  1. This also applies to raw potatoes, boiled and then cooled potatoes, green bananas, various legumes, cashews and raw oats.

  1. As you can see, these are all high carbohydrate foods, so you should limit them if you are on a low-carb diet (boiled and then cooled potatoes are probably the best choice because 75% of the carbohydrates in the potatoes are then made up of RS and this is not digested).

  1. Raw potato also contains about 15 gr. RS per 100 gr. and almost no usable carbohydrates. Potato is also very cheap and is one of the few plant foods with a complete protein. Raw potato tastes a bit bland, of course, but you can also grate it and eat it with a little salt and vinegar. Remember, a little is enough to get quite a bit of resistant starch.

  1. By the way, never eat the skin or the green parts of a raw potato, these contain a lot of toxins. So only the white part of a potato.

  1. 200 gr. raw potato (or boiled potato that is then cooled in the refrigerator for 12 hours) contains about 30 grams of resistant starch. It's important to start slowly and then build it up, because too much too quickly can cause flatulence and stomach pain.

  1. It is not necessary to take more than that, because if you have 50-60 gr. per day, the rest is simply excreted.

  1. It may take some time before you can enjoy all the benefits of RS. On average, it takes about two to four weeks to notice the first effects.

Is resistant starch worth a try?

  1. Many people are currently experimenting with resistant starch and have seen several benefits. If you're currently trying to lose weight or have high blood pressure or digestive problems - or if you're just in the mood to experiment - it's probably a good idea to give RS a shot. You never know what health benefits may be for you.

  1. There is also a good chance that RS will help activate your intestines and strengthen your immune system. This way you also work against constipation and promote healthy bowel movements.

  1. In short, by trying to add RS to your diet through the natural foods, you have nothing to lose (except weight!) And everything to gain - namely improved health. !

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