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Why do you have smelly urine?

  1. You probably don't think too much about your pee, what it looks like and how it smells. For your idea you may always have smelly urine.

  1. Take a good look, and have a good smell: If you have noticed a sudden change in the smell of your urine, it is of course important to see what caused that change in your urine is. Sometimes it could be due to a health problem, which may need to be looked at by a doctor, so don't delay investigating further. It's important to know some of the symptoms and the most common causes of foul-smelling urine so you know what to look out for. However, the use of medications or certain health conditions that are unique to you can also cause this problem. For that reason, it is critical that you notify your doctor if you discover anything out of the ordinary.

  2. Take a good look, and have a good smell: If you have noticed a sudden change in the smell of your urine, it is of course important to see what caused that change in your urine is. Sometimes it can be due to a health problem, which may need to be looked at by a doctor, so don't delay investigating further. It's important to know some of the symptoms and the most common causes of foul-smelling urine so you know what to look out for. However, the use of medications or certain health conditions that are unique to you can also cause this problem. For that reason, it is crucial that you notify your doctor if you discover anything out of the ordinary.

  1. Urine that is normal and healthy should not have a strong odor. However, sometimes you notice that it still has a strong odor or that it smells like ammonia. Sometimes it can even smell very sweet. These can all be symptoms of an underlying medical condition that must be treated.

Kidney stones

  1. Kidney stones can result in urine that smells like ammonia. Kidney stones and bladder stones can both cause an ammonia-like odor.

  1. Kidney stones can occur as a result of concentrated urine, which can cause crystals to develop and usually only occur in men. The urine is also very dark and it can sometimes be accompanied by some blood. Kidney stones can result in a constant need to urinate, the ability to urinate only a little at a time, pain while urinating and possibly even blood in the urine.

  2. Kidney stones can occur as a result of concentrated urine, which can cause crystals to develop and usually only occur in men. The urine is also very dark and it can sometimes be accompanied by some blood. Kidney stones can result in a constant need to urinate, the ability to urinate only a little at a time, pain while urinating, and possibly even blood in the urine.

Urinary tract infection / bladder infection

  1. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) and bladder infections sometimes require urgent medical attention, so be aware of the symptoms. Besides foul-smelling urine, there are other signs of a UTI such as feeling the need to urinate more often, having a sudden urge to urinate, feeling that the bladder is not completely empty even after you urinate, lower abdomen and pain and fatigue. If you have a backache, fever, chills, or a burning pain when you urinate, it's a good idea to make an appointment with your doctor right away.

  2. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) and bladder infections sometimes require urgent medical attention, so be alert for symptoms. In addition to foul-smelling urine, there are other signs of a UTI such as feeling the need to urinate more often, having a sudden urge to urinate, feeling that the bladder is not completely empty even after you urinate, pain in your lower abdomen and pain and fatigue. If you have back pain, fever, chills, or a burning pain when you urinate, it is wise to make an appointment with your doctor right away.

Cystitis

  1. An inflamed bladder in this specific type of UTI in women can also make your urine smell strange. Those with the problem complain of fish-smelling urine or strong-smelling pee. You may also experience pain or stinging when you urinate. Greater urgency to urinate and a need to go more often are other signs, so keep an eye out for this. You may also feel like you are sick or tired and irritable. The urine itself can also be dark and cloudy.

  2. In this specific type of UTI in women, an inflamed bladder can also make your urine smell strange. Those with the problem complain of fish-smelling urine or strong-smelling pee. You may also experience pain or stinging when you urinate. Greater urgency to urinate and a need to go more often are other signs so keep this in mind. You may also feel like you are sick or tired and irritable. The urine itself can also be dark and cloudy.

Dehydration

  1. Your urine contains waste products that must be expelled from the body along with moisture. When you drink less water, the waste becomes more concentrated and the urine can smell stronger than normal. This darker, more concentrated urine may appear early in the morning when you have not drunk much water in the evening or when you have not had enough water and the body is dehydrated.

  2. Your urine contains waste products that must be expelled from the body along with moisture. When you drink less water, the waste becomes more concentrated and the urine can smell stronger than normal. This darker, more concentrated urine can appear early in the morning when you haven't drunk much water in the evening or when you haven't had enough water and the body is dehydrated.

Diabetic ketoacidosis

  1. In people with diabetic ketoacidosis, the body uses fat instead of sugar or glucose to fuel the body. As a result, ketones or blood acids build up in the system, which can result in urine that smells subtly different and is not completely clear.

Diabetes Type 2

  1. If you, as a patient with Type 2 diabetes, cannot control your diabetes, you can get smelly urine. This is because glucose or sugar from your body gets into the urine because their levels in your system are too high. Other signs that may be linked to diabetes include feeling very thirsty and needing to urinate more often (especially at night), fatigue, weight loss, slow healing wounds, blurred vision and recurring thrush.

  2. If you, as a patient with Type 2 diabetes, cannot control your diabetes, you can get smelly urine. This is because glucose or sugar from your body gets into the urine because their levels in your system are too high. Other signs that may be linked to diabetes include feeling very thirsty and needing to urinate more frequently (especially at night), fatigue, weight loss, slow healing wounds, blurred vision and recurring thrush.

A gastrointestinal bladder fistula

  1. A fistula is an abnormal connection between two parts of the body that can develop as a result of injury, infection, surgery, or inflammation. A fistula can develop between the bladder and the intestines and can mix the bowel and bladder contents, causing the urine to smell quite strong. You may also see particles (mainly feces) in your urine if you have this. This can happen in people with inflammatory bowel disease such as Crohn's disease or severe diverticulitis (inflammation of the digestive tract or infection). It can also occur in the case of some types of cancers or as a result of radiation therapy in that area. If your urine stinks, always see a doctor immediately, especially if you have any of these pre-existing conditions.

MSUD (maple syrup urine disease)

  1. A rare genetic condition called Maple syrup urine disease causes problems with breaking down some of the amino acids in the proteins you consume. As a result, when the chemical build-up of undigested leucine, isoleucine and valine changes, your pee starts to smell like maple syrup. Due to the risk of brain damage in cases of fever, infection, or other physical stress, timely diagnosis is important. Lethargy, seizures, vomiting, and feeding problems are all warning signs. It can even cause a person to fall into a coma.

Phenylketonuria

  1. Another cause of stale-smelling urine is phenylketonuria or PKU. This is a genetic condition that causes phenylalanine, an amino acid that cannot be processed, to build up in the blood and even your brain. Since this build-up is not controlled, it can cause brain damage and should therefore be treated as soon as possible. Behavioral problems such as tantrums, vomiting, eczema, epilepsy, tremors and musty-smelling breath are other signs of this ailment.

A liver disease

  1. Liver problems can also lead to urine that smells musty. Since your liver has to break down urea in the body, if it doesn't work properly, it causes excess ammonia build-up. The ammonia will then get into your urine causing it to smell.

Food and supplements

  1. Certain foods or supplements can also make the urine smell. Asparagus, for example, is a known culprit, which not only causes the urine to take on a greenish hue, but also makes the urine smell foul. Other strong smelling foods such as garlic or beer and even coffee can have this effect. In addition to such foods, vitamin B6 supplements, which cause the body to eliminate excess waste through the urine, can also make you stink.

Drink a lot of coffee.

  1. Have you ever had a lot of coffee on a particularly tiring day and thought you were going crazy imagining that your pee might smell a bit like the coffee? Well, you didn't just imagine it. Nobody knows the exact reason. I don't think anyone has had the time or money to figure out why, but it's probably because of some sort of by-product that lingers after the coffee breaks down and you can still recognize that smell after it is excreted.]

You ate garlic and onions.

  1. Not only do they make your breath smell, but garlic and onions can also make your urine stink. Again, something the body produces when it breaks something down retains the smell even in the urine. It's no surprise that, considering how permanent the stench seems to be in your mouth, you somehow have to smell it in your urine too.

You ate asparagus.

  1. It is the classic culprit of smelly urine, although not everyone suffers from a smelly pee after eating asparagus. It happens, we think, because there is an enzyme in some people's bodies that breaks down asparagus in a certain way, giving it a certain smell. Experts suggest that some people just don't have that enzyme and therefore will never know what the rest of us are complaining about.

  1. There are many reasons why your urine will suddenly smell different and most of the time there really is no need to panic. How often do you actually need to urinate? While urine shouldn't have a particular odor, it can smell stronger in the morning or when you're dehydrated. But there are also certain foods that can temporarily give urine a stronger odor - here are the most likely culprits.

Bananas, salmon, turkey and chicken

  1. Foods high in vitamin B-6, if you eat enough of them, can cause the urine to smell bad. Vitamins that the body processes or does not use are released through the urine, which leads to the smell. Taking vitamin supplements or certain medications can have a similar effect or even turn your urine into a fluorescent yellow or green color.

Alcohol and coffee

  1. Because they are diuretics, these drinks can lead to odorous urine. It is not a particular brand or type of alcohol or coffee that gives this effect, it is the fact that you usually urinate more often and if you get dehydrated as a result, one of the consequences is that the urine smells stronger.

Asparagus

  1. Most people associate asparagus with smelly urine, but the odor is actually a metabolite, a substance produced during metabolism. Only a few people can smell it, so you may not notice it at all. Lucky you.

Broccoli, cauliflower and Brussels sprouts

    Curry

    1. The cumin and cilantro in a curry preserve the odor-causing chemicals that are processed by the kidneys. This can result in a pungent-smelling urine.

    Puffed wheat

    1. Puffed wheat is a classic breakfast cereal, but the puffed wheat can give off a scent like malt - similar to the way it smells in your bowl.

    The sign: dark yellow color

    1. You are dehydrated, but you probably already knew that. What you may not know is that even short-term dehydration, such as not drinking enough fluids during your workday or workout, will make you can help you on your way to serious bladder conditions. When you are dehydrated, your body tries to conserve water which makes your urine more concentrated. The chemicals in your urine come into contact with the lining of your bladder and can cause irritation, which can lead to incontinence or infection. Ideally, your pee should be consistently clear or pale yellow. To help restore hydration, increase your H2O intake after dark.

    The sign: red urine

    1. There is blood in your pee and usually indicates a condition called hematuria. This is never normal, so you should have it checked as soon as possible. Causes of bloody urine include disease, kidney disease or cancer, inflammation or infection in the kidneys, and more. Taking blood thinners can also make your urine red, but even then it's important to see a doctor.

    The sign: smelly urine

    1. First, consider any foods or drinks you've had recently. The classic example is asparagus. Some people have an enzyme that breaks down asparagus into a compound with a strong odor that you can start noticing within 20 to 30 minutes of eating the vegetable. That's nothing to worry about. Coffee can also make the urine smell strong, especially if you are dehydrated. Bacteria, which cause urinary tract infection (UTI), can also produce a foul odor. If you experience other signs of a UTI such as burning during urination, fever, or cloudy urine, see your doctor. You may need an antibiotic to fight the infection.

    The sign: foamy or effervescent urine

    1. You could have kidney disease. When your kidney's filter units don't work properly, it can lead to a build-up of protein in your urine. The protein then creates a foamy appearance of the urine when the moisture hits the toilet. You may be at risk for kidney disease if you have high blood pressure, diabetes, or a family member with the condition.

    The sign: increased urgency or frequency

    1. You may have an enlarged prostate, also known as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The prostate gland surrounds the urethra through which urine leaves the body. As the gland enlarges, it can press on the urethra and cause you to urinate continuously. Increased urgency means you have to go right away and may even have trouble holding it up. With an increased frequency, you feel the need to go more often and you may wake up several times during the night to go to the toilet.

    1. Many people think that drinking less water helps with urgency and frequency problems, but dehydration can actually cause urinary tract problems. BPH can also lead to incomplete bladder emptying, still making you feel like you have to go even after you've just been. Always contact your doctor if you notice changes in urination. Many treatments including Kegel exercises, medications and surgery are available for BPH as needed, as well as lifestyle changes such as increasing physical activity and limiting alcohol and caffeine consumption. In addition, your doctor can evaluate your current medication regimen because certain decongestants and antihistamines can worsen the symptoms of BPH.

    The sign: air or gas comes with it

    1. Bacteria in your bladder can produce gas that is released when you urinate. If you have signs of a UTI, talk to your doctor. Although not really likely, you could have a fistula, which is an abnormal opening in the bladder or between the bladder and colon. If you have a history of Crohn's disease or irritable bowel syndrome, you may be at risk of developing a fistula and may require surgery to correct the condition.

    1. Normally, urine should not have a strong smell and should have a normal yellow color. Anything that deviates from this, ie smelly urine or urine of a strange color, indicates an underlying cause that must be treated often.

    1. But make no mistake: Your urine can also change temporarily after eating some foods. Do check this before you go to the doctor with a jar of urine…

    1. Www.berkeleywellness.com/self-care/preventive-care/slideshow/whats-making-your-urine-smell

    1. Www.iflscience.com/health-and-medicine/why-does-asparagus-make-some-people-s-pee-smell-not-others/



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