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Mango Nutrition Facts

  1. Mango is one of those amazing fruits, which are both delicious to eat but can also provide many health benefits.

  1. Packed with vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients, this sweet, powerful fruit is gaining in popularity.

  2. Packed with vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients, this sweet, potent fruit is gaining in popularity.

  1. The bright yellow-orange mango is available fresh during every season and is also available all year round as juice, in frozen pieces and in powder form, making it a tropical treat for many dishes and drinks. touch and make it healthier.

  2. The bright yellow-orange mango is available fresh during every season and is also available all year round as a juice, in frozen pieces and in powder form, making it a tropical addition to many dishes and drinks. touch and make it healthier.

  1. The taste of the mango is not overly sweet and the pulp is high in fiber which allows it to give you energy all day long without causing the blood sugar to rise after you eat it .

  2. The taste of the mango is not overly sweet and the pulp is high in fiber, which allows it to give you energy all day long without causing the blood sugar to rise after you eat it .

  1. In some cultures even the leaves, bark, rind and kernel are used medicinally.

  1. Mangos belong to the same family as pistachios, gandaria and cashews. Other common names for mangoes, depending on the region or country, are mangot, manga and mangou. They originally grew almost 4,000 years ago in South Asia or to be more precise in Burma and East India. Many stories in Indian mythology mention the mango tree and Buddha is said to have often meditated under a mango tree. Mango cultivation then first spread to Malaysia, East Asia and East Africa and was finally introduced in California around 1880. They were introduced early by Portuguese explorers in Africa and Brazil, while mango cultivation in Hawaii and Florida did not begin until around the 19th century.

  2. Mangoes belong to the same family as that of pistachios, gandaria and cashews. Other common names for mangoes, depending on the region or country, are mangot, manga and mangou. They originally grew almost 4,000 years ago in South Asia or to be more precise in Burma and East India. Many stories in Indian mythology mention the mango tree and Buddha is said to have often meditated under a mango tree. Mango cultivation then first spread to Malaysia, East Asia and East Africa and was finally introduced in California around 1880. They were introduced early by Portuguese explorers in Africa and Brazil, while mango cultivation in Hawaii and Florida did not begin until around the 19th century.

  1. According to Indian beliefs, mangoes symbolize life (it is the national fruit of India) and are used in almost every sacred ritual. The mango leaves are almost always used for festivals and wedding decorations. The 'chutney', which is made from Indian mangoes, has now even become a popular side dish worldwide. Today, India is still the world's largest producer of mangoes, but Thailand, China, Brazil and Mexico also grow significant amounts of this fruit.

  1. Mangos are low in saturated fat, cholesterol and sodium. They are also an excellent source of dietary fiber and Vitamin B6 and they are a good source of Vitamin A and Vitamin C. They are rich in minerals such as potassium, magnesium and copper and they are one of the best sources of quercetin, beta-carotene and astragalin. These powerful antioxidants have the power to neutralize the free radicals in the body. Heart disease, premature aging, cancer and degenerative diseases are the result of these free radicals because they can damage cells.

  1. Mangoes appear in stories dating back to 4000 BC when Buddha sat under the branches of a mango tree to meditate and teach his disciples.

  1. Originally only found in Southeast Asia and India, this fruit was considered sacred and cultivated by Buddhist monks. Between 300 and 400 AD, people began to cultivate the mango trees in other areas as well, such as the Middle East, as well as Africa and South America.

  2. Originally only found in Southeast Asia and India, this fruit was considered sacred and cultivated by Buddhist monks. Between 300 and 400 AD, people began to grow mango trees in other areas as well, such as the Middle East as well as Africa and South America.

  1. The Portuguese brought the mango to Brazil when they arrived there with their ships and it was actually a popular crop there.

  2. The Portuguese brought the mango to Brazil when they got there with their ships and it was actually a popular crop there.

  1. It is said that in the 10th century AD the Persians brought the mangoes to East Africa.

  1. Today, Mexico, Ecuador, Haiti, Brazil and Peru are also some of the most fertile mango producing regions.

  1. The scientific name of the mango is 'Mangiferi Indica', which literally means 'an Indian plant with mangoes'.

  1. Mango is important in Indian culture, where it symbolizes love, and a gift such as a basket of mangoes is seen as a gesture of friendship.

  1. The shape of the mango has been the inspiration for the popular paisley pattern (also called laksmi) often seen in their fabrics, paintings and architecture.

  1. In some countries in Latin America, the mango is also a street food, sold by vendors who have peeled and put pieces of mango on a stick and then sell it.

  1. While in Europe, mangoes are considered by many to be an exotic and rare treat, they are in fact the most popular fruit in the world.

  1. The main reason why we eat a mango is of course the great taste! The moment we eat a mango, we tend to enjoy its rich flavor without really paying attention to the many health benefits that the fruit also offers. But the fact that mangos are included in the â € superfruitâ € ™ category because of their combination of great taste and many health benefits is of course not without reason.

Has anti-cancer properties

  1. Research has shown that the mango polyphenols can limit the inflammatory response in both malignant and non-malignant cells in the breast. It contains antioxidants such as quercetin, isoquercitrin, astragalin, fisetin, gallic acid, methyl gallate and other enzymes, which protect us from developing colon, breast, blood and prostate cancer. Vitamin A and flavonoids such as beta-carotene, alpha-carotene and beta-cryptoxanthin also help prevent various types of lung and oral cavity cancers. Antioxidants suppress the oxidation process by fighting the harmful free radicals in the body. Mango is also a rich source of dietary fiber called pectin which activates the action of a protein called Galectin 9 and is known to inhibit the growth of cancer cells. This also lowers getting colon cancer risk. The lupeol in mango also works against prostate cancer.

Promotes digestive health

  1. Being a rich source of dietary fiber, mangoes improve digestion. Like papayas, they contain enzymes that help break down protein, which aids digestion and the elimination of stool from the body. The fiber in mangoes ensures good bowel movements and keeps the digestive tract clean. Because they are naturally alkaline, mangoes can also restore acidity. They also contain various bio-active substances such as Esters, Terpenes and Aldehydes, which can further heal the digestive system.

It strengthens the immune system

  1. Mangos contain generous amounts of Vitamin C and Vitamin A, as well as 25 different types of carotenoids, which can keep your immune system healthy and strong. The antioxidants and minerals in the fruit limit microbial attacks and damage to cells. In fact, a regular sized mango is considered to be more nutritious than butter or almonds! Not only does it strengthen all of the muscles, nerves and tissues of the body, but it also cleanses the body from within to improve immunity.

It lowers cholesterol

  1. The high levels of fiber, vitamin C and pectin present in mango help to lower serum cholesterol, especially bad LDL cholesterol, in the body. The fiber in mangoes limits the secretion of a hormone leptin, which produces fat cells. Vitamin B6 regulates homocysteine ​​levels, which is harmful to blood vessels and can also cause strokes and heart attacks. The high content of polyphenolic antioxidants prevents fat build-up in the arteries, which can prevent plaque formation and artery blockage. Mangoes also contain a compound called mangiferin, which lowers bad LDL cholesterol and triglycerides and increases good HDL cholesterol.

It regulates blood pressure

  1. Fresh mango is a good source of potassium, which is an important part of the body's fluids and the fluids in the cells. Potassium helps control heart rate and blood pressure and prevents the development of cardiovascular disease.

Good for diabetics

  1. Apart from the fruit, also the mango leaves are especially beneficial for patients with diabetes because they can normalize insulin levels in the blood. The traditional remedy is to boil mango leaves in water, soak them overnight, then consume the filtered concoction in the morning. This regulates insulin levels in the body. Since mangoes have a low glycemic index, consuming them in moderate amounts will not increase the levels of sugar in the blood.

Promotes eye health

  1. The high amount of vitamin A and flavonoids such as beta-carotene, alpha-carotene and beta-cryptoxanthin present in mangoes improves vision, fights dry eyes and prevents night blindness .

Improves brain health and memory

  1. Mango contains an abundant amount of Vitamin B6, which helps improve brain function and maintain an efficient nervous system. It also improves your mood by controlling stress and is known as something that can give you an energy boost. The glutamic acid, which is present in mango, improves memory and concentration. Pyridoxine aids in the production of Gamma-Amino acid or the GABA hormone in the brain. This hormone acts as a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system and inhibits nerve transmission in the brain, causing a calming effect.

Natural remedy for heat stroke

  1. Eating raw mango has a cooling effect and can provide essential nutrients and minerals to the body. All you have to do is mix some chopped green mango pieces, some water and a teaspoon of honey in a juicer. Drinking this juice will cool your body, which can prevent or cure heat stroke.

Works as an aphrodisiac

  1. Mango is also called the 'lovefruit' because of its aphrodisiac properties. The consumption of mangoes can increase masculinity. The abundant amount of Vitamin E in mangoes helps improve the functioning of the sex hormones and increases the sex drive.

Helps with weight loss

  1. Mango is low in calories and contains no sodium or fat. Packed with nutrients in a concentrated form, mango can be a healthy snack replacement. The high fiber content helps burn extra calories as it will stimulate the body's digestive function, which can promote weight loss. The vitamins and minerals in the fruit also help you stay full for longer.

Has many benefits for women

  1. As a rich source of iron, consuming mangoes can prevent anemia. They are especially beneficial for menopausal and pregnant women, who often suffer from iron and calcium deficiencies. This fruit also contains moderate amounts of copper, which is a co-factor for the proper functioning of many enzymes such as cytochrome c oxidase and superoxide dismutase. It is also involved in the production of red blood cells.

Alkalises the body

  1. The combination of tartaric acid, malic acid and trace amounts of citric acid in mangoes helps to maintain the alkalinity of the body.

  1. Mangoes are not only great for the taste buds, but they can also nourish your skin! This exotic fruit is rich in healthy vitamins and antioxidants, which can give you beautiful and flawless skin.

Treatment for acne

  1. The vitamin C and vitamin A in mangoes are strong antioxidants that help heal acne and blemishes. Vitamin A is your skin's best friend and deficiency can lead to dull skin, open pores and burst facial veins. Vitamin C is involved in collagen formation and keeps your skin firm. If you have acne-prone skin, you can prepare an astringent with raw mango. You can do this by boiling unpeeled raw mangoes in some water. Then, for a soothing effect, apply it to your skin once it has cooled down. Drinking mango juice also prevents acne breakouts.

Illuminate your complexion

  1. The vitamin A and beta-carotene in mangoes rejuvenate your skin, leaving you with a radiant complexion. You can make your own facial cleanser by mixing in some mango pulp, flour and honey until you get a thick paste. Apply this on your face, leave it on for 15 minutes and then wash it off by gently exfoliating. Using this homemade scrub regularly cleanses your face and removes the tan you got over the summer.

Anti-aging benefits

  1. Mango is a rich source of antioxidants, which can slow the onset of skin aging and pigmentation. These antioxidants fight free radicals to prevent skin cancer and the signs of aging such as wrinkles and fine lines.

Mango for dry skin

  1. Both the consumption and application of mango acts as a natural moisturizing cream that can nourish and soothe dry skin. You can prepare a facial remedy by mixing mango pulp with six tablespoons of yogurt. Apply it on your face and wash it off after 15 minutes to get smooth and glowing skin!

Mango for oily skin

  1. If you have oily skin, you can add a mango pulp puree, let it sit for 10 minutes, then rinse it off with cold water.

  1. The benefits of mango aren't limited to your skin alone. These fruits also contain various nutrients that help to promote healthy hair. Some of the benefits for hair care are:

Promotes hair growth

  1. Mangoes contain vitamin E, which increases circulation to the scalp and improves the oxygen uptake of hair follicles. This in turn promotes hair growth.

Treatment for hair loss and gray hair

  1. The kernel of the mango has great moisturizing properties and oil, extracted from the kernel of a mango, is an excellent source of fatty acids, vitamins and minerals, all of which are vital for the health of the hair. You can also prepare it yourself at home! Remove the outer layer of the mango pit and then add it to a jar of coconut, sesame or mustard oil. Put this pot in the sunlight for a few days. If you use this concoction regularly, you will get long, black and thick hair and it will prevent hair loss and premature graying.

  1. Mangoes are very easy to find in most supermarkets and are available all year round today thanks to the dual harvesting seasons in tropical climates.

  1. When choosing mangoes, color is not the best way to judge ripeness.

  1. Red does not necessarily mean the mango is ripe, and ripe fruit can be anywhere from green to deep red, with most fruits having many different colors in the skin.

  1. Instead, gently press the skin of the fruit and see how soft it is.

  1. A ripe mango will feel soft while unripe fruit is very firm.

  1. If a fruit is very soft to the touch, it is overripe and you have to choose another mango.

  1. You can do the same as when choosing peaches because the softness will be similar in relation to ripeness.

  1. Refrigeration slows down the ripening process, so if you choose ripe fruit and don't plan to eat it right away, put it in the fridge.

  1. Unripe fruits ripen after a few days if left on the counter.

  1. If you want your fruit to ripen faster, you can put it in a paper bag and store it at room temperature.

  1. A ripe mango can be kept in the refrigerator for up to a week and on the counter for several days.

  1. When the mango is very ripe, it can be used in smoothies or made into ice cubes to flavor teas and other drinks.

  1. To freeze mangoes, peel them, chop them into chunks and seal the fruit tightly in a freezer bag.

  1. You can keep mango in the freezer for up to three months.

  1. You can also puree and freeze mangos in an ice cube tray.

  1. These can then be used in smoothies or as ice cubes to flavor teas and other drinks.

  1. There is a trick to cut mangoes that makes it much easier to serve and eat it.

  1. Mangos have a long, flat seed or kernel in the center and you can tell from the shape of the fruit in which direction that kernel is.

  1. Place the mango stem down on your cutting board.

  1. If you look at the mango from top to bottom, it looks elongated. Try to cut along the pit.

  1. In the middle you will find very little pulp but you can cut the pulp on the stone or just use it to make a snack or smoothie.

  1. The large pieces of fruit you have cut can be sliced ​​or diced for easy eating.

  1. Note that the flesh of the mango is a bit slippery, so be careful when cutting.

  1. If you want, you can cut several mangoes at the same time and then store them in a bag for easier use in different recipes later in the week.

  1. Sliced ​​mango can be kept in the refrigerator for up to five days.

  1. Mango is a versatile fruit and can be easily added to sweet dishes, although they can also make a tasty contrast in savory meals.

  1. Mangos are a perfect addition to smoothie recipes, are great when mixed into drinks and smoothies and can also be used in popsicles or sauces. Of course you can eat it plain as fruit .

  1. As a sweet treat, a raw mango is a perfect snack or you can slice and grill the mango with some sea salt for a creative savory bite.

  1. As with any new food item you want to add to your diet, start slowly and see what you like and don't like.

  1. It is also good practice to add it to foods you already like or meal preparations that you use often to make it easier to add it more often.

  1. Mangos are not recommended for use in recipes that require gelling or curing.

  1. As these fruits contain high amounts of enzymes and while they are healthy for you, they will interfere with foods such as gelatin which need to set and create an unfavorable texture.

  1. Try pairing a mango puree with iced tea or use finely chopped mango as a topping for your steak.

  1. Mango is also great with seafood and cold cuts because it has a citrusy flavor.

  1. Mango is great in desserts like frozen yogurt or ice cream, added to oatmeal, or you can use it as a crepe filling.

  1. Mangoes can be used in a variety of dishes, especially if you are hoping to achieve a citrusy sweet taste.

  1. From smoothies, breakfast and hearty lunches and dinners to dessert, mango is a versatile ingredient that can enrich many other flavors

  1. Try these easy mango recipes to spice up your meal plan this week.

Protein smoothie with mango and raspberries

  1. What do you need?

  1. Method of preparation

Grilled shrimp with mango

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  1. Method of preparation

Spicy tacos with fish and mango

  1. What do you need?

  1. For the salsa

  1. For the topping of sour cream

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  1. This is a great light and refreshing meal.

Mango dip with avocado and black beans

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Chicken curry with mango

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  1. With all these benefits, mangoes are a great way to stay healthy!

  1. Some people, for example those with certain health problems and allergies, should take precautions when considering trying mangoes.

  1. Still, for most people mangoes are an excellent addition to their diet and provide many benefits.

  1. Mangoes are a low-calorie, highly nutritious food.

  1. They contain compounds that can help you lose weight, reduce the risk of heart disease and cancer, and improve brain function and digestion. But they can also provide other health benefits besides.

  1. Mangoes are readily available and affordable for almost any budget.

  1. Mangoes are delicious to eat raw on their own or they can be creatively added to many different types of recipes.

  1. If you don't live in the tropics, you may not be able to grow your own mango trees, but you can choose the juiciest and tastiest fruits and then add them to your dishes.

  1. Since they are available all year round, you can buy a few more mangoes today.

  1. Www.passeportsante.net/fr/Nutrition/EncyclopedieAliments/Fiche.aspx?doc=mangue_nu

  1. Www.santenaturelle.org/les-8-bienfaits-de-la-mangue/



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