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21 health benefits of rosemary

  1. The most interesting health benefits of rosemary are its ability to improve memory and mood, treat Alzheimer's, cure cancer, reduce inflammation, relieve pain, and boost the immune system. to protect. The herb also helps stimulate circulation, detoxify the body, protect the body from bacterial infections, prevent premature aging and heal skin conditions.

  2. The most interesting health benefits of rosemary are its ability to improve memory and mood, treat Alzheimer's, cure cancer, reduce inflammation, relieve pain, and boost the immune system. to protect. The herb also helps stimulate circulation, detoxify the body, protect the body from bacterial infections, prevent premature aging, and heal skin conditions.

  1. That's quite a list, so we can safely say that Rosemary belongs in the list of superfoods.

  2. That's quite a list, so we can safely say that Rosemary belongs to the list of superfoods.

  1. What is rosemary?

  1. Rosemary (also called Rosmarinus officinalis) is a perennial woody evergreen native to the Mediterranean. It has fine needle-like leaves with a silvery sheen and pink, purple, white or blue flowers. It is one of the most common and used herbs in the spice rack. The spice has a warm and slightly bitter taste, yet it imparts a wonderful flavor and aroma to soups, sauces, stews, roasts and the stuffing of dishes. It can be used in dried powder form or as fresh leaves. The leaves can also be used to make tea, essential oil and a liquid extract.

  2. Rosemary (also called Rosmarinus officinalis) is a perennial woody evergreen native to the Mediterranean. It has fine needle-like leaves with a silvery sheen and pink, purple, white or blue flowers. It is one of the most common and used herbs in the spice rack. The spice has a warm and slightly bitter taste, yet it imparts a wonderful flavor and aroma to soups, sauces, stews, roasts and the filling of dishes. It can be used in dried powder form or as fresh leaves. The leaves can also be used to make tea, essential oil and a liquid extract.

  1. The spice was considered sacred by the ancient Romans, the Greeks, the Egyptians and the Hebrews and now it is mainly found in Italian cuisine. It is also called "the Monday morning herb" or "the good old herb."

  1. The plant contains an essential oil, which is known to stimulate memory.

  1. Rosemary is also known to be the herb with the most antioxidant properties and can fight fungus, bacteria and cancer.

  1. The antioxidant properties of rosemary extracts differ due to:

  1. Rosemary can be taken in a variety of forms, including:

  1. The different forms of rosemary can also produce different effects. The extracts differ mainly depending on how the rosemary is extracted and which compounds are extracted.

  1. History

  1. Although rosemary originated in the Mediterranean, it now grows in much of the temperate regions of Europe and America. Rosemary has been a valued seasoning for thousands of years and is also widely used in natural medicine. Part of rosemary's popularity came from the widespread belief that rosemary stimulated and enhanced memory, for which it is still widely used, by the way.

  1. In ancient Greece, students placed rosemary sprigs in their hair when studying for their exams, scholars also wore it in their hair, and grieving people also threw the fragrant herb into the tomb of the deceased as a symbol of remembrance.

  1. In ancient England, rosemary's ability to enhance memory turned it into a symbol of fidelity, and it played an important role in the costumes, decorations and gifts that were used at weddings. used.

  1. Rosemary oil was first mined in the 14th century, after which it was used to make Hungarian water on behalf of the Queen of Hungary, which is the nickname of a very popular cosmetic used in that time was used. In the 16th and 17th centuries, rosemary became popular as a digestive aid and pharmacists began selling it.

  1. As modern research focuses primarily on the beneficial active components in rosemary, our appreciation for the therapeutic and culinary value of this herb has been renewed.

  1. The nutritional value of rosemary

  1. Fresh rosemary contains many types of vitamins such as vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin B6, thiamine, folic acid and minerals such as magnesium, calcium, copper, iron and manganese. It also contains plenty of antioxidants such as diterpene, carnosol and rosmarinic acid in its phenolic compounds, as well as essential oils such as cineol, camphene, borneol, bornyl acetate, Î ± terpineol and Î ± pinene.

  1. The herb is also rich in dietary fiber. It is low in cholesterol and sodium but rich in saturated fats.

  1. The health benefits of rosemary

  1. Rosemary was worn by Greek scholars to improve their memory when taking exams, indicating that rosemary's mental strengthening power has been known for thousands of years.

  1. One study emphasizes this phenomenon even more. When evaluating how the cognitive performance of 144 participants was affected by aromatherapy with lavender oil and rosemary oil, the researchers found that:

  1. “Rosemary could significantly improve performance and overall quality of memory and secondary memory factors.”

  1. Probably for its significant calming effect, "lavender also produced a significant decrease in working memory performance and reduced reaction times for both memory and attention-based tasks.â €

  1. Rosemary also helped people become more alert.

  1. Lavender and rosemary evoked a feeling of â € satisfactionâ € ™ in the subjects.

  1. But it affects much more than memory, as studies have also shown that rosemary essential oil can help treat and prevent Alzheimer's disease (AD). The results of this study were published in Psychogeriatrics, and during the aromatherapy study, 28 elderly people with dementia (17 of whom had Alzheimer's) were tested.

  1. After inhaling the scent of rosemary and lemon oil in the morning and lavender and orange oil in the evening, several functional assessments were performed and all patients showed in relation to the cognitive functioning showed a significant improvement in personal orientation and all this was without unwanted side effects. Overall, the researchers concluded that "aromatherapy may have potential, especially in AD patients, to improve cognitive function." [! 146528 => 1140 = 28!] The carnosic acid in rosemary protects neurons from oxidative stress and overstimulation.

  1. Carnosinic acid builds up in nerve cells and other protective cells in the brain.

  1. Inhaling rosemary extract also improved NGF production.

  1. Carnosinic acid protects a certain part of the brain (the middle cerebral artery) from tissue damage (ischemia-reperfusion damage) and reduced blood clot formation and brain swelling in rats.

  1. Carnosinic acid also protects against oxidative stress, which in rats can cause Alzheimer's and cell death in the brain (in the hippocampus).

  1. Rosemary also prevents the formation of beta-amyloid plaque, one of the leading causes of Alzheimer's disease.

  1. Other cognitive disorders, such as dementia and ataxia, can be treated by suppressing acetylcholinesterase (AChE) production. Rosmarinic acid even suppressed AChE at low doses by 85.8%.

  1. In human ovarian cancer cells, some active ingredients of rosemary stopped cancer cells from growing and even killed existing cancer cells.

  1. There is a wide range of data to support rosemary's effectiveness against the development of certain types of cancer. These include:

  1. Rosmaric acid and rosemary extracts reduced the production of heterocyclic amines (HCAs), which are carcinogenic molecules found in meats such as beef, chicken, pork, and fish.

  1. Rosemary extracts with the highest carnosic acid concentration were the most effective. In liver cancer cells, carnosic acid reduced cell viability from 83.05% to 2.5%.

  1. A study of 10 healthy subjects found that rosemary extracts could protect the skin from UV damage, increasing its effectiveness over time.

  1. In the volunteers, who received rosemary extracts, the cells were able to survive longer. This protection helps reduce aging, cancer or UV damage.

  1. Rosemary oil is also effective against bacteria that cause acne.

  1. In a study of 40 asthmatics (DB-RT), rosemary extracts reduced several asthma symptoms such as:

  1. In addition, rosmarinic acid and rosemary extracts also reduced the production of asthma-induced inflammatory cells (eosinophils, neutrophils and mononuclear cells) in rats.

  1. Rosemary limits weight gain

  1. In rats fed high fat diets, rosemary extracts reduced weight gain by 64% and fat gain by 57% compared to rats that did not.

  1. Another study showed similar results (69% improvements over the control group). Although the extract did not reduce food intake, it did increase fat loss.

  1. Rosemary has antioxidant properties

  1. One study also found that rosemary extracts contain antioxidant properties. The strength of the antioxidant effects increased with extraction time.

  1. The rosemary extracts were better at stopping oxidative damage than everyday antioxidants such as butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), Trolox and ascorbic acid.

  1. Rosemary has antibacterial properties

  1. Rosemary extracts also completely stopped bacterial growth in multiple strains of bacteria (Gram positive and Gram negative). The effects were more pronounced for the Gram-positive bacteria.

  1. In one study, the extracts were even able to inhibit 28 of the bacterial strains studied.

  1. Rosemary also has anti-fungal properties.

  1. Rosemary extracts also showed antiviral properties against HIV, but in harmful concentrations.

  1. Carnosol is a non-toxic compound in rosemary that also has antiviral properties. However, it was not as effective as the rosemary extracts.

  1. Rosemary has anti-inflammatory properties

  1. At higher doses, rosemary extracts in human cells also reduced the production of inflammatory molecules (such as IL-1β, COX-1, TNFÎ ± and iNOS).

  1. It reduces nitric oxide production, which can cause inflammation.

  1. Rosemary essential oil significantly reduced the alteration of white blood cells (leucocytes), another process of the inflammatory response.

  1. Rosemary prevents blood clots

  1. Studies in rats have shown that rosemary has antithrombotic effects, which means that it can stop the blood from clotting and restrict blood flow.

  1. This effect is most likely because rosemary stops platelet activity, which are the molecules responsible for blood clotting.

  1. Rosemary can prevent stomach ulcers

  1. Studies in rats have shown that rosemary has anti-ulcer properties. Rosemary extract reduced ulcers in rats by 44-51.8%, depending on the type of extract. The antioxidants in rosemary help produce this effect.

  1. Rosemary helps to keep your intestines healthy

  1. Rosemary Extract:

  1. Rosemary protects the liver

  1. Carnosol (found in rosemary) prevented liver damage in rats.

  1. Consumption of carnosol reduced malondialdehyde, a marker of oxidative stress in the liver, by 69%. It also protected liver tissue from deformation and prevented the depletion of liver glycogen (energy storage molecules).

  1. Rosemary extract also reduced plasma glutamine pyruvic acid transaminase in rats by 72%.

  1. Rosemary protects the lungs

  1. Supplements containing rosmaric acid (found in rosemary) prevented fluid build-up in the lungs in rabbits.

  1. Rosemary reduces pain

  1. In traditional medicine, rosemary has been used to treat painful periods (dysmenorrhea) and also especially against stomach cramps and renal colic pain caused by the blockage of urine from the kidney to the bladder .

  1. Rosemary oil also increased the time it took for rats to respond to heat-induced pain.

  1. Rosemary can reduce spasms

  1. Rosemary leaves have anti-epileptic properties.

  1. It reduces muscle spasms. Guinea pig studies have shown that rosemary oil reduced spasms in the heart.

  1. Rosemary improves the mood

  1. In a study of 144 volunteers, the scent of rosemary, much more than lavender scent or no scent at all, induced feelings of satisfaction.

  1. Mice treated with rosemary leaf infusions also showed less anxiety.

  1. Rosemary helps reduce coughs

  1. Rosemary leaves help to release mucus and saliva (sputum) to heal a cough.

  1. Rosemary helps hair to grow

  1. Androgenetic alopecia, more commonly known as male pattern baldness or female pattern baldness, is a common form of hair loss believed to be related to a person's genetics and sex hormones. It arises because a byproduct of testosterone dihydrotestosterone (DHT) attacks hair follicles, leading to permanent hair loss, which is a problem for both sexes, but especially for men who produce more testosterone than women.

  1. One study looked at the effectiveness of rosemary oil compared to a conventional conventional form of treatment (minoxidil 2%) in hair loss due to androgenetic alopecia (AGA). For six months, 50 subjects used AGA rosemary oil, while another 50 subjects used minoxidil. After three months, no group saw improvement, but after six months, both groups saw an equal increase in the number of hairs. The natural rosemary oil, compared to the minoxidil, caused less itching of the scalp.

  1. An animal study also demonstrates the ability of rosemary to inhibit DHT in patients with hair regrowth disrupted by testosterone treatment.

  1. Rosemary can increase freedom of movement

  1. The use of rosemary oil increased movement / activity in rats. The greater activity is due to increases in 1,8-cineole.

  1. Rosemary fights arthritis

  1. Rosemary fights oxidative damage to the joints and surrounding tissues by reducing the progression of rheumatoid arthritis.

  1. Side Effects of Using Rosemary

  1. Many of the studies mentioned use high concentrations of rosemary extract to see the intended effects. Experiencing many of its effects, such as fighting cancer, may therefore be unlikely with daily use of rosemary.

  1. Rosemary supplements can reduce fertility

  1. The reproductive organs of the rat became smaller after prolonged consumption of rosemary leaf extract. It also reduced the number of cells, mobility and density. All of these factors have a negative impact on fertility. Pregnant female rats were also more likely to lose the fetus.

  1. Rosemary increases itching of the scalp

  1. In a study (DB-RCT) with 50 permanent balding patients, who used rosemary oil to grow hair, the oil increased scalp itching.

  1. Rosemary can raise blood glucose levels

  1. Rosemary can increase blood glucose levels. In rabbits with induced diabetes, glucose levels increased by 55% in two hours.

  1. Rosemary oil can irritate the skin

  1. In persons with very sensitive skin, bath preparations containing rosemary oils may cause dermatitis or skin redness (erythema).

  1. Rosemary can cause convulsions

  1. While rosemary can reduce convulsions, at high doses, a compound in rosemary can actually cause epilepsy-like seizures.

  1. Pregnant women are advised not to consume too much rosemary as it can cause an abortion. Breastfeeding women are also advised to use rosemary in moderation.

  1. Diabetics and those with high blood sugar are also advised to consume rosemary in moderation, as it can raise blood sugar.

  1. A meta-analysis found that doses of rosemary extract of 0.1-100 µg / ml were the most effective in fighting cancer. However, due to the high number of concentrations used in various studies, no effective dose for human use has been established.

  1. Overall, rosemary supplements have been classified as safe by the FDA and have been shown to produce very low toxicity in rats, even at high concentrations and extended periods of use.

  1. Drug interactions

  1. Rosemary with cancer drugs

  1. The combination of rosemary extract with cisplatin, an anti-cancer agent, increased the effectiveness of the drug against human ovarian cancer cells by 50% to 85%.

  1. Using rosemary extract with 5-fluorouracil, the most common colon cancer drug improved outcomes by suppressing genes that contribute to drug resistance.

  1. Rosmarinic acid with certain Vitamin D derivatives increased the effectiveness of the drug in several studies of leukemia.

  1. Rosemary with painkillers

  1. The combination of rosemary oil with common painkillers such as codeine and Tylenol increased pain tolerance in rats.

  1. How to select and store rosemary?

  1. Choose fresh rosemary whenever possible because it tastes better than the dried form of the herb. The fresh rosemary should look fresh and the twigs should be a deep sage green in color and free of yellow or dark spots.

  1. Dried herbs and spices are widely available in supermarkets and if you can't find it there you can also try the market or a spice shop. Often these stores have an extensive selection of dried herbs and spices, which are of superior quality. As with other dried herbs, when purchasing dried rosemary, you should select organically grown herbs as this will give you greater assurance that the herbs do not contain pesticide residues and have not been sprayed (among other possible harmful effects, spraying rosemary can lead to a significant decrease in carotenoid content).

  1. Fresh rosemary should be stored in the original packaging or wrapped in a slightly damp paper towel in the refrigerator. You can also store the rosemary sprigs in an ice cube tray, which is covered with water or stock, and then add later when preparing soups or stews. Dried rosemary should be stored in a tightly sealed container in a cool, dark, dry place and it will remain fresh for about six months.

  1. Cooking Tips

  1. Rinse the rosemary quickly under cold running water and then pat it dry. Most recipes call for rosemary leaves, which can be easily removed from the stem. You can also add the whole branch to seasonal soups, stews and meat dishes and then simply remove it before serving.

  1. A few simple suggestions:

  1. Finallyâ €!

  1. Rosemary should be available in every kitchen. Besides the fact that it has many benefits for your health, it is also very tasty and you can use it in many different ways in cooking. Just have a try!

  1. Do you already have rosemary in the kitchen cupboard? How do you use it?

  1. Www.jardiner-malin.fr/sante/romarin-bienfaits-vertus.html

  1. Home.naturopathe.over-blog.com/article-le-romarin-et-la-sante-72997052.html

  1. Www.passeportsante.net/fr/Solutions/PlantesSupplements/Fiche.aspx?doc=romarin_ps



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